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Evaluation of Citrullus sp. Germ Plasm for Resistance to Watermelon Mosaic Virus 2. A. G. Gillaspie, Jr., U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Regional Plant Introduction Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797. J. M. Wright, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Regional Plant Introduction Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797. Plant Dis. 77:352-354. Accepted for publication 24 November 1992. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1993. DOI: 10.1094/PD-77-0352.

A total of 670 Citrullus species accessions were evaluated for resistance to watermelon mosaic virus 2. In greenhouse tests seedlings to be evaluated were mechanically inoculated, and in field tests plants in spreader rows were mechanically inoculated. Plants were considered virus free by the absence of disease symptoms and by negative results in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our working definition of resistance was the ability of a plant to withstand, oppose, lessen, or overcome the attack of a pathogen. Plants were considered resistant if virus free 1014 days after final inoculation in the greenhouse, or virus free 46 wk after inoculation of the spreader-row plants in the field, even though many were subsequently infected. Selections from 10 C. lanatus accessions (PI 189316, PI 189317, and PI 189318 from Zaire; PI 244018, PI 244019, and PI 255137 from South Africa; PI 164708 from India; and PI 494529 and Egun, which are Egusi-types, and PI 306782 from Nigeria) were resistant in both field and greenhouse tests. Five C. colocynthis accessions (PI 386016, PI 386024, PI 386025, and PI 386026 from Iran and PI 388770 from Morocco) possessed some resistance in both field and greenhouse tests.