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Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Epidemic in Flue-Cured Tobacco in Georgia. A. K. Culbreath, Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia College of Agriculture, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton 31793-0748. A. S. Csinos, P. F. Bertrand, and J. W. Demski. Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia College of Agriculture, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton 31793-0748; Professor, University of Georgia, Cooperative Extension Service, Tifton 31793-1209; and Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Georgia Experiment Station, Experiment 30212. Plant Dis. 75:483-485. Accepted for publication 26 October 1990. Copyright 1991 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-75-0483.

Spotted wilt, caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), was first diagnosed in flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in Georgia in 1986. By 1988, tobacco fields in 28 of 48 tobacco-producing counties had plants infected with TSWV, but the incidence was less than 1%. In 1989, spotted wilt was observed in all tobacco-growing counties in Georgia. Average incidence was low with 57% of plants examined showing symptoms. However, in some fields, incidence was more than 20% and losses in plant stand were observed. First symptoms appeared shortly after tobacco seedlings were transplanted to the field in March, and numbers of symptomatic plants increased through initiation of harvest in June.