Previous View
 
APSnet Home
 
Plant Disease Home


Disease Note.

First Report of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus on Celery and Three Weed Species in Argentina. O. Gracia, Agricultural Experiment Station Mendoza, INTA, Casilla de Correo No. 3, 5507 LujŠn de Cuyo, Argentina. J. M. Feldman, Agricultural Experiment Station Mendoza, INTA, Casilla de Correo No. 3, 5507 LujŠn de Cuyo, Argentina. Plant Dis. 73:859. Accepted for publication 17 May 1989. Copyright 1989 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-73-0859C.

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was isolated from celery plants (Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Miller) Pers.) with chlorotic spots with reddish necrotic centers on leaves, brown necrotic patches in petioles, and stunted growth, in the coastal region of Rio Negro (Viedma). Incidence in most of the fields surveyed was below 10%. The virus was also isolated from the following weeds, which showed no symptoms or only a mild mosaic with stunted growth and which may act as reservoir hosts: Solanum atriplicifolium Gill. ex Nees (Rio Negro), Sonchus oleraceus L. (Rio Negro), and Galinsoga parviflora Cav. (Buenos Aires). Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, S. atriplicifolium is a new host of TSWV. The virus was identified by host range, stability in sap, and electron microscopy. Natural hosts of TSWV reported earlier in Agentina include: tomato, tobacco, potato, pepper, lettuce, artichoke (1), peanut, zinnia, dahlia, and the weed Flaveria bidentis (L.) O. Ktze. (2). Portulaca oleracea L., a common weed in Argentina and an important TSWV reservoir in other countries, was never found infected.

References: (1) O. Gracia and J. M. Feldman. Plant Dis. Rep. 62: 1076, 1978. (2). O. Gracia and J. M. Feldman. Phytoparasitica 13:3, 1985.