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Spatial Distribution of Xiphinema rivesi and Persistence of Tomato Ringspot Virus and Its Vector in Soil. M. W. Bitterlin, Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Plant Pathology, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Cornell University, Geneva 14456. D. Gonsalves, Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Cornell University, Geneva 14456. Plant Dis. 71:408-411. Accepted for publication 22 October 1987. Copyright 1987 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-71-0408.

Persistence of tomato ringspot virus (TmRSV) in soil was correlated with presence of its nematode vectors. Population densities of Xiphinema rivesi, the only species present, and TmRSV incidence were determined by assaying soil samples collected over 4 yr. The samples were stored at 13 C and periodically examined for Xiphinema spp. and TmRSV over a period of 13 yr. Although initial density of X. rivesi fluctuated extensively, TmRSV was transmitted to cucumber bait plants from most soil samples. Numbers of X. rivesi were greatly reduced after 2 yr of storage without growing plants but were at a similar level after 3 yr. TmRSV was transmitted to bait plants after 2 yr of storage but not after 3 yr. Even though this study was done at controlled temperature, the results suggest that viruliferous X. rivesi has the potential for long-term survival in soil.