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Fruit Volatiles Inhibitory to Monilinia fructicola and Botrytis cinerea. Charles L. Wilson, Lead Scientist, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, Box 45, Kearneysville, WV 25430, and West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506-6108. Jerry D. Franklin, and Brian E. Otto. Technicians, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Appalachian Fruit Research Station, Box 45, Kearneysville, WV 25430, and West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506-6108. Plant Dis. 71:316-319. Accepted for publication 28 October 1986. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1987. DOI: 10.1094/PD-71-0316.

Sixteen volatile compounds occurring naturally in fruits were tested for their effects on spore germination and growth of Monilinia fructicola and Botrytis cinerea. Nine of these compounds (benzaldehyde, benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, δ-decalactone, γ-caprolactone, γ-decalactone, γ-octalactone, methyl salicylate, and ?-valerolactone) greatly inhibited spore germination of both fungi at 1,250 Ál/L. Benzaldehyde totally inhibited spore germination of B. cinerea at 25 Ál/L and germination of M. fructicola at 125 Ál/L. Three of the compounds (benzaldehyde, methyl salicylate, and ethyl benzoate) completely inhibited growth of M. fructicola and B. cinerea at 370 Ál/L. Ethyl benzoate was fungicidal against M. fructicola and fungistatic against B. cinerea, whereas methyl salicylate and benzaldehyde were fungicidal against both fungi.