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Short Life of Peach Trees as Related to Tree Physiology, Environment, Pathogens, and Cultural Practices. C. C. Reilly, Plant Pathologist, USDA/ARS, Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 87, Byron, GA 31008. A. P. Nyczepir, Nematologist, R. R. Sharpe, Soil Scientist, W. R. Okie, Horticulturist, and P. L. Pusey, Plant Pathologist, USDA/ARS, Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 87, Byron, GA 31008. Plant Dis. 70:538-541. Accepted for publication 4 November 1985. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1986. DOI: 10.1094/PD-70-538.

Concentrations of prunasin, ninhydrin-positive material, and reducing sugars were determined in bark samples obtained from the north and south sides of trunks of healthy peach trees and those affected by peach tree short life (PTSL). Prunasin concentration was consistently decreased by greater than 90% on the south side of PTSL trees, where cold injury is commonly most severe, and by about 50% on the north side. Both the north and south sides of apparently healthy trees in PTSL orchards had about the same concentration of prunasin as trees in non-PTSL orchards. Concentrations of ninhydrin-positive materials did not change for PTSL trees. Reducing sugars decreased 50 and 30% on the south and north sides of PTSL trees, respectively, compared with apparently healthy trees in PTSL orchards. Pseudomonas syringae and Prunus necrotic ring spot virus were not determining factors in the PTSL syndrome. Populations of Criconemella xenoplax were significantly greater under PTSL trees than under apparently healthy trees in PTSL orchards. Soil pH of all PTSL orchards was within the range of 4.555.88.

Keyword(s): bacterial canker, Prunus persica, replant disease.