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Identification and Incidence of Pepper Viruses in Northeastern Georgia. C. P. Benner, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602. C. W. Kuhn, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602; J. W. Demski, Department of Plant Pathology, Georgia Experiment Station, Experiment 30212; J. W. Dobson and P. Colditz, Georgia Mountain Station, Blairsville 30512; and F. W. Nutter, Jr., Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens 30602. Plant Dis. 69:999-1001. Accepted for publication 21 May 1985. Copyright 1985 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-69-999.

Virus diseases are a major constraint to pepper production in northeastern Georgia, where disease incidence was nearly 100% in both 1983 and 1984. Viruses were identified in leaf samples collected from nine fields by serological (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunodiffusion) and infectivity tests. Tobacco etch virus (TEV) was the predominant virus in each field (more than 96% of plants tested). Cucumber mosaic virus was detected in eight fields, three of which had 2050% infection. Potato virus Y was detected in eight of 914 samples. Pepper mottle and tobacco mosaic viruses were not positively identified during these surveys. TEV was isolated from perennial Solanum and Physalis species located in and near pepper fields, suggesting these hosts may be a source of primary inoculum. Lower disease incidence was observed in TEV-resistant pepper lines. Oil sprays applied weekly did not alter disease incidence or severity.