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Nature and Control of Anthurium Decline. M. Aragaki, Plant Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu 96822. W. J. Apt, Plant Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu 96822; R. K. Kunimoto, Research Associate, and W. H. Ko, Plant Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Hawaii, Hilo 96720; and J. Y. Uchida, Research Associate, University of Hawaii, Honolulu 96822. Plant Dis. 68:509-511. Accepted for publication 19 December 1983. Copyright 1984 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-68-509.

Stunted plants producing few, small blossoms have been a serious and persistent problem in the culture of anthurium (Anthurium andraeanum) in Hawaii. Examination of roots and lower stems revealed a consistent association with the burrowing nematode (Radopholus similis). In greenhouse inoculation experiments, burrowing nematodes increased by as much as 12-fold and induced weakened plants with dry weights significantly lower than those of uninoculated controls. On declining plants in the field, applications of the nematicide fenamiphos at 2.911.6 kg a.i./ha resulted in increased vigor and increased flower yield.