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Metham Sodium Applied by Sprinkler Irrigation to Control Pod Rot and Verticillium Wilt of Peanut. J. Krikun, Division of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50 250, Israel. Z. R. Frank, Division of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan 50 250, Israel. Plant Dis. 66:128-130. Accepted for publication 1 May 1981. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1982. DOI: 10.1094/PD-66-128.

Peanut pod rot, caused by a Pythium-centered disease complex, was efficiently controlled by metham sodium. The biocide was applied through sprinkler irrigation to a depth below the geocarposphere. Although methyl isothiocyanate was not highly effective against Pythium oospores, the treatment considerably reduced pod rot in the same seasonís yield but had no aftereffect on the next peanut crop. Apparently, for one season metham sodium efficiently reduced microbial populations that are synergistic with Pythium spp. in causing pod rot. The treatment also controlled Verticillium wilt by killing microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae. Tests are being conducted to define optimum dosages and depths of application of the biocide in various soils.

Keyword(s): Arachis hypogaea, Fusarium solani, Pythium myriotylum.