Previous View
 
APSnet Home
 
Plant Disease Home


VIEW ARTICLE

Research

Postharvest Decay in Florida Leatherleaf Fern. F. J. Marousky, Research Horticulturist, European Marketing Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. P. P. Q. De Wildt, Research Plant Pathologist, European Marketing Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Plant Dis. 66:1029-1031. Accepted for publication 19 February 1982. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1982. DOI: 10.1094/PD-66-1029.

A Rhizoctonia sp., Cylindrocladium pteridis, and C. heptaseptatum were isolated from leatherleaf fern (Rumohra adiantiformis) arriving in Europe from Florida. In laboratory tests, the three organisms were pathogenic. Inoculation of fronds with Rhizoctonia sp. resulted in symptoms at 24 C, but decay of the fern increased when injured. Leaflets inoculated with Rhizoctonia sp. and held at 10 C showed little decay. C. pteridis and C. heptaseptatum were highly infectious and more virulent than Rhizoctonia sp. Leaflets inoculated with C. heptaseptatum or C. pteridis became severely infected when held at 24 C but were not infected when held at 4.5 C. Inoculated leaflets held at 24 C for 2 days and subsequently held at 4.5 C were severely infected. Leaflets inoculated with either Cylindrocladium species developed lesions that coalesced and produced a bronze-brown decay over 20100% of the leaflet surface. Benomyl effectively controlled postharvest decay caused by Rhizoctonia sp. and C. pteridis. A delay in benomyl treatment after inoculation increased the incidence of decay in leaflets.

Keyword(s): fungicide, simulated shipping temperature.