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Fusarium Head Blight Occurrence and Effects on Sorghum Yield and Grain Characteristics in Texas. L. L. Castor, Graduate Student, Department of Plant Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843. R. A. Frederiksen, Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843. Plant Dis. 64:1017-1019. Copyright 1980 American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/PD-64-1017.

Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium moniliforme, occurred on grain sorghum grown throughout central and southern Texas in 1979. Disease surveys determined that 43 and 91% of the fields (600,000 ha) in central and southern Texas, respectively, had plants with symptoms. Weight and size of kernels from FHB panicles were significantly reduced, compared with kernels from normal-appearing panicles. Kernel weights were reduced an average of 12% (ranging from 4 to 22%) in southern Texas. FHB did not reduce the quality of harvested grain, but based on estimated yield figures, FHB probably reduced yield in Texas by 32,00078,000 t and resulted in a $3.2 million to $7.2 million loss to farmers.

Keyword(s): Gibberella fujikuroi, grain molds, grain weathering, Sorghum bicolor.