Previous View
 
APSnet Home
 
Phytopathology Home


VIEW ARTICLE

Disease Control and Pest Management

Copper Resistance in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae from Cherry Orchards and its Associated Transfer in Vitro and in Planta with a Plasmid. G. W. Sundin, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology and the Pesticide Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824-1312; A. L. Jones, and D. W. Fulbright. Department of Botany and Plant Pathology and the Pesticide Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824-1312. Phytopathology 79:861-865. Accepted for publication 3 April 1989. Copyright 1989 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-79-861.

Copper-resistant Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae was recovered from blossoms of sweet and of sour cherry from nine and 12 orchards in Michigan in 1987 and 1988, respectively. Isolates that did not grow on low nutrient CYE-glycerol medium amended with 40120 g of cupric sulfate per milliliter were considered sensitive. Isolates that grew on media amended with 160240 g of cupric sulfate per milliliter were considered to have low resistance and those that grew on media amended with 280320 g of cupric sulfate per milliliter were considered to have high resistance. Among 17 copper-resistant isolates collected in 1987, 14 with high resistance contained a single plasmid of 4673 kilobase pairs (kb) and three with low resistance lacked a detectable plasmid. A 61-kb plasmid was present in all 29 copper-resistant isolates selected in 1988 on media containing 200 g of cupric sulfate per milliliter. Among 15 copper-sensitive isolates, only one contained a plasmid. Copper resistance and a 61-kb plasmid were transferred in filter matings to three copper-sensitive recipient strains of P. s. syringae from each of six copper-resistant donor strains. A resulting exconjugant was successfully used as a donor strain in matings with two recipient strains. Copper resistance also was transferred when suspensions of donor and recipient strains were infiltrated into bean leaves. Populations of copper-sensitive strains of P. s. syringae were reduced significantly more than populations of copper-resistant strains on bean leaves sprayed with cupric hydroxide. All P. s. morsprunorum detected in blossom samples was copper sensitive, and copper resistance was not transferred from P. s. syringae in filter matings to P. s. morsprunorum.