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A Major Gene for Resistance to Anthracnose Stalk Rot in Maize. B. Badu- Apraku, Department of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853; V. E. Gracen(2), and G. C. Bergstrom(3). (2)Department of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853; (3)Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. Phytopathology 77:957-959. Accepted for publication 19 December 1986. Copyright 1987 The American Phytopathological Society. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-77-957.

Maize inbred LB31, derived from an international synthetic composed of temperate and tropical germ plasm, is highly resistant to anthracnose stalk rot (ASR) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. Resistance to ASR appeared to be controlled by a single, dominant gene as determined by a generation means analysis of the cross LB31 B37. ASR resistance of LB31 was also exhibited in hybrids involving inbreds related to Mo17, B14A, A632, and Wf9. The results of this study suggest that a single, dominant gene conditions ASR resistance in the inbred LB31.

Additional keywords: breeding for disease resistance.