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Ecology and Epidemiology

Relationships Between Aulacorthum solani and Soybean Dwarf Virus: Effect of Temperature on Transmission. Vernon D. Damsteegt, Research plant pathologists, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research, Ft. Detrick, Bldg. 1301, Frederick, MD 21701; Adrianna D. Hewings, Research plant pathologists, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research, Ft. Detrick, Bldg. 1301, Frederick, MD 21701. Phytopathology 77:515-518. Accepted for publication 17 September 1986. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1987.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-77-515.

Transmission characteristics of two strains of soybean dwarf virus (SDV-D and SDV-Y) were studied using Japanese and California populations of the aphid vector Aulacorthum (Acyrthosiphon) solani. Latent periods of the virus strains were 12 and 15 hr in aphids from the Japanese colony and 15 and 21 hr in aphids from the California colony for SDV-D and SDV-Y, respectively. Both strains persisted longer in the Japanese than in the California aphids and SDV-D persisted longer than SDV-Y in both aphid populations. Both strains had minimal acquisition access (AAP) and inoculation access periods (IAP) of 30 min; optimal AAP and IAP were 48 hr. Transmission and acquisition efficiency of both strains by either vector was greater at 2022 C than at 29 C, 1011 C, or 5 C.

Additional keywords: luteovirus, subterranean clover red leaf virus.