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Methods for Study of Raindrop Impact on Plant Surfaces with Application to Predicting Inoculum Dispersal by Rain. K. M. Reynolds, Postdoctoral research associate, Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University (OSU), Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC); L. V. Madden(2), D. L. Reichard(3), and M. A. Ellis(4). (2)(4)Associate professors, Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University (OSU), Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC); (3)Agricultural engineer, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Wooster 44691. Phytopathology 77:226-232. Accepted for publication 9 July 1986. This article is in the public domain and not copyrightable. It may be freely reprinted with customary crediting of the source. The American Phytopathological Society, 1987.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-77-226.

A drop-generating and photographic system has been developed to obtain detailed information on splash dispersal events. Uniform drops 0.181.89 mm in diameter are produced by a piezoelectric crystal that is activate a microprocessor-controlled timing circuit that can trigger up to mm are produced by a solenoid pump. Both drop generators can produce single drops on demand. The drop generator activation signal is used to activate a microprocessor-controlled timing circuit that can trigger-up seven strobe lamps for use in multiple-exposure photography. A primary, programmable delay is used to control the start of the flash sequence. Delay between flashes is controlled by the frequency of an oscillator signal input to the timer. Strobe sequences can be used to determine the velocity, size, and number of droplets formed by a splash crown.