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Postharvest Pathology and Mycotoxins

Aflatoxin Contamination of Peanuts Resistant to Seed Invasion by Aspergillus flavus. David M. Wilson, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA 31794; Aubrey C. Mixon(2), and John M. Troeger(3). (2)Research Agronomist, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (ARS, USDA), University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA 31794; (3)Agricultural Engineer, ARS, USDA, University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA 31794. Phytopathology 67:922-924. Accepted for publication 17 January 1977. Copyright 1977 The American Phytopathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121. All rights reserved.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-67-922.

Harvested nonshelled and shelled peanuts of accessions, P. I. 337409 and P. I. 337394 F, previously reported to be resistant to penetration and colonization by Aspergillus spp. of the A. flavus group, were held under high humidity conditions and the aflatoxin levels that developed were compared with those reached in similarly stored peanuts of an easily colonized genotype, P. I. 343360, and a commercially grown cultivar, Florunner. The peanuts were not artifically inoculated, but each genotype had a natural seed infection of 2-3% by Aspergillus spp. of the A. flavus group. All genotypes had appreciable levels of aflatoxins after 9-10 days of storage in relative humidities of 87-95% at 23-26 C. Accession P. I. 337394 F accumulated aflatoxins at 802% RH after 9 days at 23 C. Peanut genotypes that are penetrated with difficulty by Aspergillus spp. of the A. flavus group may have advantages in the field, but not when stored in high relative humidities at temperatures favorable for fungal deterioration.

Additional keywords: Arachis hypogaea, ochratoxin.