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Vector Relations

Effect of Host Preference on Transmission of Curly Top Virus to Tomato by the Beet Leafhopper. P. E. Thomas, Plant Pathologist, Agriculture Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Prosser, WA 99350; R. K. Boll, Agriculture Research Technician, Agriculture Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Prosser, WA 99350. Phytopathology 67:903-905. Accepted for publication 11 January 1977. Copyright 1977 The American Phytopathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121. All rights reserved.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-67-903.

During the 1st hr after viruliferous beet leafhoppers were confined on seedlings of a preferred host, sugar beet, and a nonpreferred host, tomato, an equal percentage of plants of the two species became infected. During the next 3 hr, percentage transmission to tomato was twice as great as to sugar beet. Thereafter, transmission to sugar beet continued steadily, but transmission to tomato dropped off and nearly stopped 8 hr after confinement. This pattern of transmission appeared to reflect changes in feeding behavior and health of the vector when confined on the two species. Leafhoppers confined on tomato began dying after 12-16 hr, and few were still alive after 72 hr. Leafhoppers fed only 3% sucrose solution lived for up to 2 wk. Leafhoppers fed only water died at about the same rate as those on mature tomato. Leafhoppers held 8 hr on tomato and 16 hr on sugar beet daily lived as well as those on sugar beet.

Additional keywords: Circulifer tenellus, Lycopersicon esculentum.