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Etiology

Characterization of Iris fulva Mosaic Virus. O. W. Barnett, Department of Plant Pathology and Physiology, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29631; Miriam Alper, Department of Plant Pathology and Physiology, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29631, Present address: Virus Laboratory, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel. Phytopathology 67:448-454. Accepted for publication 29 September 1976. Copyright 1977 The American Phytopathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121. All rights reserved.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-67-448.

An Iris fulva I. brevicaulis hybrid had faint mosaic symptoms. A virus was transmitted from this hybrid to Belamcanda chinensis on which a chronic mosaic developed. The virus, designated Iris fulva mosaic virus, also was transmitted to Amaranthus caudatus and Chenopodium quinoa. In B. chinensis sap infectivity was lost after aging 4 days, heating at 60 C for 10 min, or diluting to 105. In leaf-dip preparations, virus particles had a normal length of 767 nm. The particles appeared swollen in sodium phosphotungstate stain, but not in ammonium molybdate. They were flexuous in MgCl2 but straight in EDTA. Cytoplasmic inclusions were composed of scrolls, tubes, laminated aggregates, pinwheels, and bundles. In leaf-dip serology the virus was not related to other known iris viruses.