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A Stem Rot of Bean Seedlings Caused by a Sterile Fungus in Florida. C. M. Howard, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and Soil Chemistry, University of Florida, Agricultural Research Center, Dover, FL 33527; K. E. Conway(2), and E. E. Albregts(3). (2)Assistant Research Scientist, University of Florida, Department of Plant Pathology, Gainesville, FL 32611; (3)Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and Soil Chemistry, University of Florida, Agricultural Research Center, Dover, FL 33527. Phytopathology 67:430-433. Accepted for publication 19 October 1976. Copyright 1977 The American Phytopathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121. All rights reserved.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-67-430.

A stem rot disease of bean seedlings, which first was observed in central Florida in 1968, resembled southern blight which is caused by Sclerotium rolfsii. However, lesions on infected stems never extended above the soil line and there were no sclerotia on the stems or on the surface of surrounding soil. Isolations from the stems consistently yielded a sterile fungus which failed to produce sclerotia after prolonged growth in culture or on infected plants. Pathogenicity of this fungus was proved on beans grown in artifically infested soil. The identity of the fungus was not determined because of the lack of reproductive structures. Hyphal clamp connections indicate that it is a Basidiomycete, and its cultural and other characteristics are similar to those of Athelia spp. that have been classified on the basis of the perfect state.

Additional keywords: Phaseolus vulgaris.