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Resistance

Cephalosporium Stripe of Winter Wheat: Pathogen Virulence, Sources of Resistance, and Effect on Grain Quality. D. E. Mathre, Department of Plant Pathology and Department of Plant and Soil Science, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59715; R. H. Johnston(2), and C. F. McGuire(3). (2)(3)Department of Plant Pathology and Department of Plant and Soil Science, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59715. Phytopathology 67:1142-1148. Accepted for publication 18 March 1977. Copyright 1977 The American Phytopathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121. All rights reserved.. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-67-1142.

The virulence of 25 isolates of Cephalosporium gramineum from various areas in North America was determined on winter wheat. Most isolates caused more than a 40% yield reduction while a few isolates caused little yield reduction. Increased virulence was reflected in adverse effects on grain and flour quality; i.e., test weight, flour yield, and physical dough properties. However, these effects were not great enough to significantly affect loaf volume plus grain and texture. Over 1,000 red winter wheats from the U.S. Department of Agriculture World Collection and other sources were screened for resistance to C. gramineum in the field using oat kernel inoculum. In terms of the least reduction in yield, kernel weight, and kernels per head, when infected by highly virulent isolates, the four best lines were P. I. 278212, C. I. 11222, and Crest line row components 40 and 51.