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Capsidiol Induction in Pepper Fruit during Interactions with Phytophthora capsici and Monilinia fructicola. D. R. Jones, Postdoctorate Research Fellow, Agriculture Canada, Research Institute, University Sub Post Office, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7, Present address of the senior author: Department of Plant Pathology and Agricultural Entomology, University of Sydney, Sydney, N.S.W. 2006, Australia; C. H. Unwin(2), and E. W. B. Ward(3). (2)(3)Senior Technician, and Plant Pathologist, respectively, Agriculture Canada, Research Institute, University Sub Post Office, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7. Phytopathology 65:1417-1419. Accepted for publication 30 June 1975. DOI: 10.1094/Phyto-65-1417.

The concentration of the phytoalexin, capsidiol, in pepper fruit 24 hours after inoculation with Monilinia fructicola was 2 × 104M, sufficient in vitro to account for resistance of the fruit tissue to this fungus. The concentration tripled in the subsequent 24-hour period. However, concentrations of capsidiol were too low to explain the temporary resistance of pepper fruit tissue to Phytophthora capsici (isolate 18) in an initial incompatible interaction, which persisted for approximately 48 hours after zoospore inoculation.

Additional keywords: Capsicum frutescens.