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Here's your News Capsule
for August 15, 2019
Plant Health 2019 Meeting photos
 
Thank you to everyone who attended Plant Health 2019 and supported our annual gathering with another year of exciting science and networking. More than 1,200 attendees contributed to and gleaned knowledge from a robust program, including keynote and plenary presentations, 11 workshops, 22 technical sessions, 22 special sessions, and 615 poster presentations. To top it all off, we danced the night away at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame!
(pictured left to right: Kira Bowen, Immediate Past President, Larry Madden, 2019 Award of Distinction Recipient, and Mary Palm, President 2017-2018) 
See Meeting photos
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The bacterial microbiome of sclerotia from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Rhizoctonia solani and surrounding soil was evaluated to identify potential biocontrol agents. Cernava et al. found that the sclerotia have specific bacteria that suppress the growth of mycelium. This discovery may lead to development of biocontrol agents to control soilborne fungal pathogens.
 
Read Phytobiomes
 
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How does competition between microbes influence their ability to persist on a plant host? Examining the role of type IV secretion systems in competition between and within several Agrobacterium genomospecies, Wu and colleagues found evidence that other genetic features modify the impact of effector-immunity pairs on interbacterial antagonism.

Read MPMI
 
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This study focused on the potential of arthropods in the dissemination of the bacterium involved in drippy blight disease, Lonsdalea quercina. Sitz et al. found that that a diverse set of insects naturally occur on diseased trees and may disseminate L. quercina.

Read Plant Disease
 
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"As a professional living and working in a developing country I believe the single most valuable benefit of APS membership is being up to date with the latest information in the field. Now I am aware of the latest news and concerns for plant pathologists around the world, and do not feel isolated from them anymore."
 
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APS News Capsule © 2019 The American Phytopathological Society
 
 
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