​​​Unmanned Aerial Vehicles For Making Plants Healthy- Do We Have a Winner?​​​

Tuesday, November 3, 2020
12:00 - 4:00 p.m. Central ​Time

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Interested in learning more about this workshop topic outside of this event?
Check out these articles in our Plant Disease journal and Plant Health Progress​ journal.


Workshop Description:​

Efficient management of plant diseases is dependent on accurate and timely detection. In the past century we have seen tremendous diagnostic advances from a traditional, field-walk scouting, to the deployment of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for real-time mapping of crop, soil and environment variables. UAVs are a powerful deployment tool for a number of newly developed technologies for early management intervention, and cut across the traditional boundaries of pest detection through the combination of automation and on-board data analysis. UAVs offer a number of unique, interdisciplinary opportunities to excite and engage the next generation of farmers and researchers. The use of UAVs has become more widespread due to increased affordability and safety, evolution of imaging sensors, and “on-board” image processing coupled with machine learning tools for data acquisition and processing. In the last decade, UAVs became a valuable decision making tool. The use of UAV systems to deploy novel sensor systems could facilitate quick and accurate field detection, thus improving disease management efficacy through timely and site-specific applications. In the International Year of Plant Health (2020), this virtual workshop session will give the attendees an opportunity to learn about the UAV technology & sensors, path to licensing, training & safety, UAV workflow, rules & regulations and its current applications.   


Workshop Organizers

Vessela Mavrodieva, USDA-APHIS-PPQ S&T CPHST, Beltsville, MD; Leela Uppala, University of Massachusetts-Amherst-Cranberry Station, East Wareham, MA; Kaitlin Gold, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Moderator

Leela Uppala, University of Massachusetts-Amherst-Cranberry Station, East Wareham, MA; Kaitlin Gold, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY