Special Sessions for the 2015 APS Annual Meeting

Special session titles are listed alphabetically and linked to session descriptions, below. (Content as listed is subject to change.)  

15th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium
Advances in Gene Silencing
APS-CSPP Joint Symposium on Plant Pathology and Disease Control
 Banana Production at the Crossroad: Impact of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4
Blocking the Transmission of Vector-Borne Plant Pathogens, Dream or Reality?
Buzzing the Tower: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)/Drones for Applications in Plant Pathology
Careers in Industry
Climate Cycles, Climate Forecasting, and Disease Cycles Spanning Multiple Years
Contributions from Population Genomics to Plant Pathology
Emerging Downy Mildew Diseases: Where Have We Been, Where Are We Going?
Engagement in Plant Pathology: You Can’t Start Too Early
Impact of Innovative Postharvest Practices on Trade and Food Safety
Impact of Repeat Elements on Genome Evolution and Pathogen Biology
Life Beyond the Plant: Bacterial Wars
Mycotoxins: From Production, Secretion, and Detection to Effects on Plants and Mammals
Nematology: From Microbiomes to Management
New Products & Services 
Participatory Plant Disease Research: Advancing Sustainable Food Production Through Farmer-Researcher Partnerships
Physiological Basis and Modeling for Climate-Induced Changes in Forest Pathogens and Their Hosts
Phytobiome-Plant Interactions: Bridging Phytobiome Structure and Function
Phytophthora tentaculata, A Newly Introduced Nursery Pathogen and How Clean Stock Production Systems Can Limit Disease Spread
Plant Pathologists of the Future: Showcasing the Top Graduate Students from APS Division Meetings
Schroth Faces of the Future: Nematology
Seed Transmission of Vector-Borne Pathogens: Mysteries, Caveats, and Mechanisms


 
15th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium - From Local to Global: New Developments in Disease Risk Prediction and Crop Loss Assessment 

Organizers: Clive Bock, USDA ARS SEFTNRL, Byron, GA, U.S.A.; Peter Ojiambo, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Kelsey Andersen, Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO. U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CLARE) Committee
Financial Sponsors: Monsanto Company, APS Foundation, CLARE

The APS Crop Loss and Risk Evaluation (CLARE) Committee, in conjunction with financial support from the APS Foundation and private industry, will be sponsoring the 15th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium to be held in Pasadena, CA. This symposium, entitled “15th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium - From Local to Global: New Developments in Disease Risk Prediction and Crop Loss Assessment”, will feature five graduate student presentations highlighting research that leads to improved global food security based on disease risk prediction and crop loss assessment, plant disease epidemiology, pathogen biology and disease management strategies.

  • Understanding antibiotic resistance in Erwinia amylovora: Impacts on disease management and epiphytic bacterial populations in apple orchards. KIERSTEN BEKOSCKE, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Epidemiology and control of spinach downy mildew in coastal California. ROBIN CHOUDHURY, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • A three-pronged approach to late blight management: Host resistance, diagnostics, and understanding pathogen diversity. ZACHARIAH HANSEN, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Epidemiological concepts and methods to predict the effects of plant morphology and partial resistance components on sunflower black stem epidemics. ANDRÉ SCHWANCK, Inst. National de la Recherche Agronomique, Toulouse, France
  • Characterization and distribution of fungi associated with needle defoliation of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). STEPHEN WYKA, University of New Hampshire, Dover, NH, U.S.A.

 
Advances in Gene Silencing

Organizers: Bhanu Priya Donda and Naidu Rayapati, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Virology
Financial Sponsors: The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, APS/APHIS Widely Prevalent Virus Committee, Virology Committee 

The discovery of gene silencing has transformed many facets of plant biology. This special session will examine the current state of knowledge and the future potential of this elegant technology. Invited speakers will highlight the latest advances in multifaceted gene-silencing pathways encompassing novel mechanisms orchestrating host-pathogen interactions. The presentations will benefit attendees of the APS annual meeting and inspire students to pursue research in this emerging field of plant science.

  • Antiviral silencing in plants and animals. SHOU-WEI DING, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Tomato bushy stunt virus as a model system to study antiviral RNA silencing. HERMAN SCHOLTHOF, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Diverse silencing suppressors and RNAi interactions among members of the Closteroviridae. BRYCE FALK, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • A reexamination of the relationship between RNA silencing and cross protection. FENG QU, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • A novel chemopreventive strategy using tumor suppressor microRNAs produced in edible plants. VICKI VANCE, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, U.S.A.

 

APS-CSPP Joint Symposium on Plant Pathology and Disease Control

Organizers: Yulin Jia, USDA, Stuttgart, AR, U.S.A.; Guo-Liang Wang, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: APS-CSPP Working Group; Virology

This symposium will provide an overview of research that is being directed towards the identification of major resistance genes, understanding the genetic and molecular bases, and the prospects for their utilization in crop breeding and protection. Significant accomplishments on genomic interactions of important crops and their pathogens will be presented by selected speakers from both APS and CSPP and other distinguished speakers, including a graduate student from United States and China. This will include results from understanding the genetic and molecular bases of disease resistance and their interactions with environmental signaling, interactions of hosts and their parasites, and how to control parasites using genetics and pesticides. Genes that condition resistance to many economically important diseases have been identified. Genetic markers closely associated with resistance genes are useful for breeding new cultivars with increased resistance. Equally useful is the identification and isolation of the resistance genes for use in characterization of the resistance response, precision marker development, and stable incorporation of the genes into existing popular cultivars.

  • Engineered nucleases to combat virus infections. S. DINESH-KUMAR, University of California, College of Biological Sciences, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Aflatoxin production and environmental oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus: Implications for host resistance. JAKE FOUNTAIN, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
  • The resistance mechanisms of Fusarium graminearum to fungicides. ZHONGHUA MA, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • The plant Mediator co-activator complex as an integrative hub for transcriptional regulation of jasmonate-signaled plant immunity. CHUANYOU LI, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Identification of disease resistance genes for enhancement of existing potato cultivars. DENNIS HALTERMAN, USDA/ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Progresses on pathogenesis and control of the rice false smut pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens. WENXIAN SUN, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China
  • A novel tobacco RING E3 ligase NtRFP1 attenuates symptoms induced by a geminivirus-encoded βC1 via mediating the ubiquitination and degradation of βC1. XUEPING ZHOU, Zhejiang University and Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China

 

Banana Production at the Crossroads: Impact of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense TR4

Organizer: Robert Kemerait, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Tropical Plant Pathology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Diagnostics

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, race 4 (Fusarium wilt of cotton) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, tropical race 4 (Fusarium wilt of banana) threaten production of their respective host crops on an international scale. The objective of this special session is to both compare and contrast the pathogens, the impact of the diseases, and the political ramifications of these two diseases.

  • Detection, identification, and the epidemiology of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense, tropical race 4. GERRIT KEMA, Wageningen University and Research Center, Wageningen, Netherlands
  • The spread and impact of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense, tropical race 4 on global banana production. AGUSTIN MOLINA, Bioversity International, Los Banos, Philippines
  • Tropical race 4 of Panama disease threatens export and smallholder production of banana. RANDY PLOETZ, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.

 

Blocking the Transmission of Vector-Borne Plant Pathogens, Dream or Reality? 

Organizers: Rodrigo Almeida, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; Anna Whitfield, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Virology

Disrupting pathogen transmission is a key target for control of vector-borne pathogens. This special session will feature discussion of successful systems that target pathogen and vector factors that can disrupt the cycle of disease. 

  • Insights on virion retention (and inoculation): implications for reducing the whitefly transmission of foregut-borne criniviruses. JAMES NG, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Disrupting circulative virus transmission by blocking virus-vector interactions. ANNA WHITFIELD, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • The acrostyle in aphid stylets: An Achille’s heel for virus transmission? MARILYNE UZEST, National Institute for Agronomic Research (INRA), Montpellier, France
  • RNAi strategies targeting hemipteran vectors of plant pathogens. BRYCE FALK, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Blocking the vector transmission of non-circulative bacteria. RODRIGO ALMEIDA, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. 

 

Buzzing the Tower: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)/Drones for Applications in Plant Pathology

Organizers: Mathews Paret, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A.; Jason Woodward, Texas A&M University, Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Integrated Plant Disease Management; Extension

This special session will cover an exciting new area in research on applications of UAV technology in plant pathology. The proposed key speakers include two plant pathologists, an agricultural engineer, a specialist in remote sensing, and a regulator from the Federal Aviation Administration. This special session will review and cover the most current research and future potential in utilization of UAVs in applications in plant pathology.

  • Drone-ing for plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems. DAVID SCHMALE, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
  • A success story from 20 years of use of UAV (Yamaha RMAX) for crop dusting in Japan and experimentation in California grape production. KEN GILES, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Autonomous aerial robots for precision farming. JNANESHWAR DAS, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A. 
  • UAVs for orchard management: Prospects and procedures for aerial monitoring of plant health status in the Northeastern U.S. MATT WALLHEAD, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A.
  • Development of a high-resolution remote sensing system for agricultural applications. DANIEL HOLMAN, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.

 

Careers in Industry

Organizer: Rubella Goswami, Dupont Crop Protection, Newark, DE, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Industry; Early Career Professionals; Diversity and Equality

This special session will inform graduate students about careers for plant pathologists in the private sector. Speakers will explore the breadth of opportunities available and discuss the skills needed to obtain a position and to develop your career. Other topics will include areas that graduate school does not prepare you for in the private sector and the transition from academia into the private sector.

  • Exploring some of the myths of working in industry. PAUL KUHN, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.
  • Plant pathology career opportunities in the seed industry. STACI ROSENBERGER, Monsanto, Woodland, CA, U.S.A.
  • A plant pathologist’s role in the discovery and development of disease control products. RYAN BOUNDS, Syngenta Crop Protection, Visalia, CA, U.S.A.
  • The role of private practitioners in providing research or support for industry. CHRISTOPHER BECKER, BAAR Scientific LLC, Romulus, NY, U.S.A. 

 

Climate Cycles, Climate Forecasting, and Disease Cycles Spanning Multiple Years

Organizers: David Gent, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Alissa Kriss, Syngenta, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Epidemiology; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CLARE)
Financial Sponsors: Valent USA, Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CLARE) Committee

There have been several advancements in understanding short-term climate cycles, their drivers, and the association between these cycles and multiyear cycles of plant diseases. This special session will bring together climatologists, meteorologists, and pathologists to present on concepts of climate cycles, climate forecasting, and disease prediction spanning multiple seasons.

  • Weather prediction from climatology. GEORGE TAYLOR, Applied Climate Services, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • AgroClimate: Climate and weather information for monitoring and predicting strawberry disease risk in Florida. CLYDE FRAISSE, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Use of climate patterns in prediction of Fusarium head blight epidemics. ALISSA KRISS, Syngenta, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A. 

 

Contributions from Population Genomics to Plant Pathology

Organizers: Niklaus Grunwald, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Richard Hamelin, Natural Resources Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology

New computational and sequencing approaches allow genome-wide characterization of DNA polymorphism. Moving from traditional population genetic marker systems like AFLP or SSRs to genome-wide SNP analyses provides new challenges and opportunities. This special session will provide a panel of speakers at the forefront of population genomics. The special session will discuss approaches on the computational and sequencing side and applications to plant pathogens.

  • The changing landscape of sequencing technologies. IGOR GRIGORIEV, US DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA, U.S.A.
  • Population genomics of emerging Fusarium disease of avocado. JASON STAJICH, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • The making of a tree pathogen: Horizontal gene transfers, host jumps, and speciation. RICHARD HAMELIN, Natural Resources Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • Recombination hot spots in the genome of the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. EVA STUKENBROCK, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany
  • Pitfalls and potential of population genomics. NIKLAUS GRUNWALD, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.

 

Emerging Downy Mildew Diseases: Where Have We Been, Where Are We Going?

Organizers: Jo Anne Crouch, USDA-ARS-SMML, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; Cristi Palmer, The IR-4 Project, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Diseases of Ornamental Plants

We are at a crossroads of knowledge with downy mildews. Devastating new diseases are emerging at an accelerating pace. This special session will provide an interdisciplinary assessment of emergent downy mildews across multiple commodity groups. Tackling the past, present, and future of emergent downy mildew diseases, we will consider common challenges across cropping systems and potential pathways forward.

  • Where have all these emergent downy mildews come from? Using herbarium collections and comparative genomic tools to retrace pathogen populations. JO ANNE CROUCH, USDA-ARS-SMML, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • The utility of comparative mitochondrial genomics of downy mildews for development of molecular tools for identification and diagnostics. FRANK MARTIN, USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.
  • How can we minimize our losses? Control strategies in downy mildew systems. MARY HAUSBECK, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • Predicting epidemics: Risk assessment and role of host susceptibility in cucurbit downy mildew outbreaks. PETER OJIAMBO, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Comparative genomics of inter- and intra-specific variation in downy mildews. RICHARD MICHELMORE, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion. 

 

Engagement in Plant Pathology: You Can’t Start Too Early

Organizer: David Gadoury, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: D. M. Gadoury, APS internal communications officer; CADRE; Office of Public Relations and Outreach (OPRO); Teaching

We are a high-impact/low-visibility profession and provide few opportunities to learn about plant pathology and possible careers. This special session highlights programs that engage students in their formative years and covers a breadth of models to increase awareness and appreciation of plant pathology. The special session directly supports the vision of APS to increase the exchange of knowledge of plant health within diverse communities and to provide preparation for careers in plant pathology.

  • Kids and plants: The summer science camp for elementary school students. CHRISTINE SMART, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Planting Science: A mentoring program in plant sciences to capture the interest of middle and high school students. CATRINA ADAMS, Botanical Society of America, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.
  • Magical mushrooms and mischievous molds—The gateway to a lifelong fascination with plant pathology. GEORGE HUDLER, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Recruiting for the profession of plant pathology through internships. DAVID GADOURY, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Reflections on an undergraduate research experience: How I was hooked. WILLIAM WELDON, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.

 

Impact of Innovative Postharvest Practices on Trade and Food Safety

Organizers: Richard Kim, Pace International, Wapato, WA, U.S.A.; Kari Peter, Penn State University, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Postharvest Pathology; Chemical Control; Food Safety Interest Group

The special session will present and discuss the impact of postharvest pathology research on trade and food safety. Topics for consideration include risk management and technologies to improve postharvest food safety, overcoming exporting barriers, and innovative methods of decay control, all of which influence billions of dollars of the U.S. fruit industry.

  • Risk management strategies for microbial food safety in apples. KAREN KILLINGER, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.
  • Systems approach-based mitigation of postharvest diseases to overcome trade barriers for Washington apples. CHANG-LIN XIAO, USDA-ARS, SJVASC, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.
  • Thermofogging—Innovative technology to control fruit decays without potential food safety concerns. YONG-KI (RICHARD) KIM, Pace International, Wapato, WA, U.S.A.
  • New biopesticide and exempt-from-tolerance postharvest treatments to manage fruit decays in the United States. JAMES ADASKAVEG, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Postharvest processing technologies to improve food safety and quality. BRENDAN NIEMIRA, USDA-ARS Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A. 

 

Impact of Repeat Elements on Genome Evolution and Pathogen Biology

Organizers: Steve Klosterman, USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; Shuxian Li, USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics
Financial Sponsor: The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation

New hypotheses have emerged on how repeat elements impact genome evolution and biology of plant-pathogenic fungi. Repetitive elements are thought to cause local plasticity, leading to rapid pathogen adaptation to new niches or host ranges. This special session will focus on recent analyses of repetitive elements in remodeling the genomic landscape of plant-pathogenic fungi.

  • Repetitive DNA and effectors in the compartmentalized genomes of Fusarium oxysporum species complex. LI-JUN MA, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, U.S.A.
  • Comparative genome analysis of members of Magnaporthaceae sheds light on pathogenesis. RALPH DEAN, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Repeats, RIPping, and genome evolution in Mycosphaerella graminicola (Zymoseptoria tritici), the cause of septoria tritici blotch of wheat. STEPHEN GOODWIN, USDA-ARS/Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Effector diversification within compartments of the Leptosphaeria maculans genome. THIERRY ROUXEL, INRA, Thiverval-Grignon, France
  • Repetitive elements, architects of genomic variation in Verticillium. KATHERINE DOBINSON, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada 

 

Life Beyond the Plant: Bacterial Wars

Organizers: Alejandra I. Huerta, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Jong Hyun Ham, Louisiana State University Agriculture Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Graduate Student; Bacteriology; Biological Control

In the last decades, research has focused on plant-microbe interactions and how the knowledge generated from these studies has lead to a better understanding for disease control. However, prior to reaching the host, bacteria must survive and thrive in harsh environments and outcompete intra- and interspecies competitors. In this special session, we will showcase recent findings on the modes of action, function, diversity, and applications of toxin immunity proteins produced by bacteria.

  • Biochemical and structural basis of toxicity and immunity in contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems. DAVID LOW, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A.
  • Molecular mechanisms of the Agrobacterium Type VI DNase effector secretion and antibacterial activity during plant colonization. ERH-MIN LAI, Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Identification and characacterization of interstrain chemical weapons in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex. ALEJANDRA HUERTA, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 

 

Mycotoxins: From Production, Secretion, and Detection to Effects on Plants and Mammals

Organizers: Rebecca Sweany, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; Hillary Mehl, Virginia Tech, Suffolk, VA, U.S.A.; Zhi-Yuan Chen, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Mycotoxicology

This special session will present current research on mycotoxin production by plant-pathogenic fungi and their effects on both plants and animals. Talks will discuss regulation of aflatoxin production and the role of vesicles in the synthesis of mycotoxins. Additional topics will address mycotoxin detection methods and problems with mycotoxin-contaminated grain and effects of the pathogens on grain quality. Finally, toxicity of mycotoxins to humans and livestock will be presented.

  • The Cross-kingdom languages of Aspergillus flavus. NANCY KELLER, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Cellular localization of mycotoxin synthesis and mechanisms for export. H. CORBY KISTLER, USDA, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • Using immunology and LC-MS/MS to simultaneously detect multiple mycotoxins in food and feed. PEIWU LI, Oil Crops Research Institute of CAAS, Wuhan, Hubei, China
  • Feeding issues in hogs, cattle, and poultry from diseased and mycotoxin contaminated grain. BRIAN RICHERT, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Human health effects of mycotoxins: Advances and updates. JIA-SHENG WANG, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.

 

Nematology: From Microbiomes to Management

Organizers: Gregory Tylka, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; Vergel Concibido, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Nematology
Financial Sponsors: Monsanto Company, Bayer CropScience

This special session will highlight recent results of scientists working on a continuum of research topics, from the study of the microbiome and its effects on plant-parasitic nematodes to neural systems and multitrophic interactions with plant-parasitic nematodes to automated phenotyping for nematode resistance breeding. The special session will culminate with a presentation by an innovative seed potato farmer whose enterprise has used advances in nematology to meet real-world crop production needs.

  • Soil microbiome potential for management of phytoparasitic nematodes. AURELIO CIANCIO, CNR, Istituto per la Protezione Sostenibile delle Piante – IPSP, Bari, Italy
  • Comparative nematode neuroanatomy: Wandering through worm wiring. NATHAN SCHROEDER, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.
  • Multitrophic interactions and the chemical ecology of nematodes. JARED ALI, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • Breeding for nematode resistance: New phenotypic tools for a new era. SUSANNAH COOPER, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO, U.S.A.
  • Advances in science to meet real world crop production needs. DON SKLARCZYK, Sklarczyk Seed Farm LLC, Johannesburg, MI, U.S.A.

 

New Products & Services

Organizer: Christopher B. Meador, Weatherford, TX, U.S.A. 
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Industry
 

  • Zephyr Pathogen Identifier for plant pathogens. ANDREW R. FLANNERY, PathSensors, Inc., Baltimore, MD, U.S.A.
  • New non-fumigant contact nematicide, NIMITZ, registered by EPA. HERBERT YOUNG, ADAMA, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • New Grapevine LR3 Reagent. ALAN WEI, Agri-Analysis LLC, West Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
  • ARM Trial Management for 2016. STEVEN GYLLING, Gylling Data Management, Inc., Brookings, SD, U.S.A.
  • New products and label updates from Syngenta. RYAN BOUNDS, Syngenta Crop Protection, Visalia, CA, U.S.A.
  • Potyvirus ImmunoStrip. HEATHER CHAMBERS, Agdia, Inc., Elkhart, IN, U.S.A.
  • Pyriofenone. CHRISTOPHER GEE, ISK Biosciences, Kearney, MO, U.S.A.
  • Kenja/Isofetamid. CHRISTOPHER GEE, ISK Biosciences, Kearney, MO, U.S.A.
  • Introduction of Next Generation Sequencing. DAN LUO, Novogene Bioinformatics Technology, Inc., Beijing, China
  • ILeVO. JENNIFER RIGGS, Bayer Crop Science, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.
  • AmyProtec 42 Biofungicide. BILL STONEMAN, Andermatt Biocontrol AG, McFarland, WI, U.S.A.
  • Oxiphos. VIJAY CHOPPAKATLA, Biosafe Systems, East Hartford, CT, U.S.A.
  • Terraclean 5.0. VIJAY CHOPPAKATLA, Biosafe Systems, East Hartford, CT, U.S.A.
  • Soil and spray adjuvant contributions from Simplot Grower Solutions. LORIANNE FOUGHT, Simplot, Madera, CA, U.S.A.
     

Participatory Plant Disease Research: Advancing Sustainable Food Production Through Farmer-Researcher Partnerships

Organizer: Ruth Genger, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Diversity and Equality; Tropical Plant Pathology; Graduate Student

Participatory research is now a proven approach for reaching farmers in marginal environments who have low adoption rates for modern varieties and disease management systems. This special session will address the breadth of participatory approaches to improve plant disease management in low-input, variable environments, including participatory breeding, establishment of seed systems in developing countries, germplasm conservation and evaluation, and farmer peer-to-peer education and outreach.

  • Participatory sweetpotato breeding and germplasm evaluation for resistance to viral and fungal diseases. ROBERT MWANGA, International Potato Center, Naguru Hill, Kampala, Uganda
  • Participatory research with tree crop farmers in the Pacific. DAVID GUEST, The University of Sydney, Eveleigh, NSW, Australia
  • Participatory plant breeding and the effects of on-farm conservation and selection on diversity and adaptation. JULIE DAWSON, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • A framework for optimizing participatory research. KAREN GARRETT, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Improving the health and productivity of organic potato crops through participatory research. RUTH GENGER, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 

 

Physiological Basis and Modeling for Climate-Induced Changes in Forest Pathogens and Their Hosts

Organizers: Jane Stewart, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; Isabel Munck, U.S. Forest Service, Portsmouth, NH, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Forest Pathology; Mycology; Epidemiology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens

Outbreaks of tree diseases caused by native and introduced pathogens are predicted to become more frequent and intense under climate change. Forests provide critical ecosystem services, including clean water and air, fiber, nontimber forest products, wildlife habitat, recreational, and aesthetic values. Predicting climate change influences on forest diseases will foster forest management practices that minimize adverse impacts of diseases.

  • Emergence of a new disease, bur oak blight, with recent increases in spring rainfall. THOMAS HARRINGTON, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Differential fitness in ecotypes of the pitch canker pathogen: Implications for climate change and forest health. TANIA QUESADA, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Ecology of Swiss needle cast in Western Oregon Coastal forests: Ecophysiology and tree ring analysis correlate intensification to climate warming. DAVID SHAW, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • Risk of forest diseases given climate change: Case study of Phytophthora ramorum. SUSAN FRANKEL, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Albany, CA, U.S.A.
  • Invasion biology of P. cinnamomi: Its impact and spread after its introduction over a century ago. MEGAN MCCONNELL, Bartlett Tree Experts, College Park, MD, U.S.A.

 

Phytobiome-Plant Interactions: Bridging Phytobiome Structure and Function

Organizers: Caroline Roper, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; Martin Chilvers, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A; Linda Kinkel and Laura Felice, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; Jose Pablo Soto-Arias, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Bacteriology; Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics; Soil Microbiology and Root Disease, Public Policy Board
Financial Sponsor: The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation 

Plants live in intimate association with diverse microbes, referred to as the plant microbiome. Microbiome composition and functions are influenced by the plant, and are critical to plant health and productivity. Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of the composition of plant microbiomes, yet our understanding of the function interactions between plants and their microbiomes has lagged behind. This session will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the complex connections between plants and their microbiomes, and especially on the functional impacts of the microbiome on plant health in both non-model and model plant systems.

  • Plants, living with their phytobiomes. JIM TIEDJE, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • The grape endophytic microbiome and its impact on Pierce's disease development. PHILIPPE ROLSHAUSEN, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Plant determinants of root microbiome composition. SARAH LEBEIS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.
  • Oomycete community diversity: The soybean root rot complex. ALEJANDRO ROJAS, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • Local and systemic bacterial colonization of germ-free plants with synthetic microbial communities of the Arabidopsis microbiota. YANG BAI, Max Planck Inst Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln, Germany 

 

Phytophthora tentaculata, A Newly Introduced Nursery Pathogen and How Clean Stock Production Systems Can Limit Disease Spread

Organizer: Kathleen Kosta, California Dept. of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Regulatory; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Diagnostics; Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Forest Pathology

Phytophthora tentaculata is a federally regulated pathogen found for the first time in the United States infecting Mimulus sp. Reports of the first detection, biology, host range, and studies on a treatment method will be presented. Discussions on how the implementation of a clean stock production system can be used in native plant nurseries to reduce the spread of Phytophthora tentaculata, as demonstrated in an Oregon program. Experiences and lessons learned with P. ramorum can be applied to this situation.

  • Phytophthora tentaculata, a new Phytophthora species in the United States affecting California native plants, grown in nurseries. SUZANNE ROONEY-LATHAM, California Department of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
  • Phytophthora tentaculata and other Phytophthora species introduced into California native habitats via nursery stock. TEDMUND SWIECKI, Phytosphere Research, Vacaville, CA, U.S.A.
  • Phytophthora tentaculata prioritized host range study for restoration nursery producers: California native plants and woody perennials. KAREN SUSLOW, National Ornamental Research Site at Dominican University of California, San Rafael, CA, U.S.A.
  • New advances in molecular diagnostics for Phytophthora tentaculata. TIMOTHY MILES, California State University Monterey Bay, Seaside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Studies in the use of heat to control Phytophthora tentaculata. WOLFGANG SCHWEIGKOFLER, Dominican University of California, San Rafael, CA, U.S.A.
  • Implementing a systems approach of best management practices in native plant nurseries. KATHLEEN KOSTA, California Dept. of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
  • Evaluating the efficacy of the systems approach at mitigating five common pests in Oregon nurseries. NANCY OSTERBAUER, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Salem, OR, U.S.A.
  • A systems approach to nursery and greenhouse phytosanitary certification (SANC) for plant production facilities in the U.S. RUTH WELLIVER, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A.
  • P. ramorum: Successes, failures and lessons learned that can be applied to P. tentaculata. RUSS BULLUCK, USDA APHIS PPQ CPHST, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Panel Discussion and Answer Questions: How can we best stop the introduction and spread of new invasive pathogens in the nursery system? KATHLEEN KOSTA, California Dept. of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.

 

Plant Pathologists of the Future: Showcasing the Top Graduate Students from APS Division Meetings

Organizer: Jay Pscheidt, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Division Forum: Jay Pscheidt and David Rosenberger

A technical paper session is requested to showcase the top graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) from each of the six APS division meetings. The chosen speakers will give a presentation of their research that won them top honors at their respective division meeting. Speakers are allowed 15 minutes for their presentations. This special session will highlight some of the top students in the field of plant pathology and broaden the engagement and visibility of APS divisions.

  • Caribbean Division ‒ An approach for screening Musa accessions for resistance to virulent Mycosphaerella fijiensis isolates. LEDERSON GANAN, CIAT, Palmira, Colombia
  • North Central Division ‒ Overexpression of a modified eIF4E gene confers broad-spectrum resistance to Potato virus Y and is dominantly inherited in various potato varieties. ERICA ARCIBAL, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Northeastern Division ‒ Establishment of soil and tissue potassium sufficiency ranges for control of anthracnose disease on annual bluegrass turf. CHARLES SCHMID, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A.
  • Pacific Division ‒ Endophytic bacteria as biological control for the management of Fusarium euwallaceae—A symbiotic fungus of the Polyphagous Shot Hole Borer. FRANCIS NA, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Potomac Division ‒ Evaluation of fungicides for efficacy against pod rot of lima bean caused by Phytophthora capsici. ANDREW KNESS, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A.
  • Southern Division ‒ Pathogenicity evaluations of novel ectotrophic root-infecting fungi on ultradwarf bermudagrass. PHILLIP VINES, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.


Schroth Faces of the Future: Nematology

Organizers: Kimberly Cochran, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; Patti Hosack, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; Martha Malapi-Wight, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Early Career Professionals

A special session featuring early career professionals presenting their research.

  • Nematode management without methyl bromide in California grape production. J. ALFONSO CABRERA, Bayer CropScience, Fresno, CA, U.S.A.
  • Exploration of nematode-secreted CLE Effectors for developing tools to accelerate nematode resistance breeding in crop plants. SHIYAN CHEN, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Assessment of Fluopyram in the management of nematodes in soybean and cotton. TRAVIS FASKE, University of Arkansas, Lonoke, AR, U.S.A.
  • Exploiting the host cell cycle machinery to control the root-knot nematode feeding site development. PAULO VIEIRA, Virginia Tech and Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, USDA, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.

 

Seed Transmission of Vector-Borne Pathogens: Mysteries, Caveats, and Mechanisms

Organizers: Phyllis Himmel, Marrone Bio Innovations, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; Ron Wallcott, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; Judith Brown, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Seed Pathology

The impact of seed transmission on the epidemiology and management of vector-borne pathogens will be discussed using documented and emerging pathogen-vector-host systems. Too often, reports of seedborne pathogens stop at detection. It is critical to use robust data and follow seed industry standards to determine seed transmission of these pathogens. The accuracy of these investigations affects our ability to understand the nature of these complex disease systems and impacts the global movement of commercial seed.

  • The impact of bacterial and viral diseases in hybrid seed production: The human factor. CHESTER KUROWSKI, Monsanto Company, Woodland, CA, U.S.A.
  • Introduction and overview of viruses seed-transmitted and non-persistently transmitted by aphids. SUE TOLIN, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
  • Detection methods for Candidatus Liberibacter, and the threat of transmission in true seed and vegetatively propagated plant parts, JUDITH BROWN, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
  • Survey of diagnostic tools for detection of viroids and impacts of test results on the seed industry. ROSEMARIE HAMMOND, USDA ARS NEA MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • Role of seed transmission in the spread of maize lethal necrosis in East Africa. MARGARET REDINBAUGH, USDA, ARS Corn Soybean and Wheat Quality Research and Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.

 

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