Special Sessions

Listed alphabetically. Sessions are preliminary and subject to change.

14th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: New Contributions to Epidemiology and Plant Health

Organizer: Forrest Nutter, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Epidemiology; BASF Corp; Monsanto Corp; Agdia; Syngenta; Valent; APS Foundation
Financial Sponsors: Monsanto Company; Syngenta; Valent USA Corporation; BASF Corp; Agdia

The APS Epidemiology Committee, in conjunction with financial support from the APS Foundation and private industry, will be sponsoring the 14th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium to be held in Minneapolis, MN. This symposium, entitled “14th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: New Contributions to Epidemiology and Plant Health”, will feature four to five presentations highlighting graduate student research aimed at providing a better understanding of the epidemiology and management of plant diseases. Melhus participants will be competitively selected by a panel of expert judges. Selection is based on research significance and potential impacts within the field of plant disease epidemiology and the APS community.

  • New approaches to assess coast live oak resistance before infection by the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. ANNA O. CONRAD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
  • Forecasting infection risk—A tool for late bight management. IAN M. SMALL, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Modes of seed infection by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and population diversity in New York. MATTHEW TANCOS, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Staying one step ahead of a pathogen: Hop powdery mildew in the Pacific Northwest. SIERRA WOLFENBARGER, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.

 

A Systems Approach for Microbe Management: From Food Safety to Plant Health

Organizers: Jennifer Parke, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Niklaus Grunwald, USDA-ARS Horticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Margery Daughtrey, Cornell University–LIHREC, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Food Safety Interest Group

Systems approaches are widely used in the food processing industry to reduce the risk of contamination by human pathogens. Recently, systems approaches have been applied to a broad spectrum of agricultural production systems to manage human pathogens and plant pathogens. In this session, which bridges food safety and plant pathology, experts will describe case studies and address challenges in analyzing hazards, identifying critical control points, implementing management strategies, and educating growers.

  • Introduction: Why do we need systems approaches to manage plant diseases? NIKLAUS GRUNWALD, USDA-ARS Horticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach. SANJA ILIC, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
  • Application of a systems approach for production of leafy greens free of human pathogens: Promoting grower education and change of practice. TREVOR SUSLOW, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • A systems approach for producing greenhouse tomatoes free of human pathogens and plant pathogens. MELANIE IVEY, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
  • Bacterial rots of onion in Pennsylvania: Tracking sources of infection and targeting critical control points. BETH GUGINO, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • A systems approach for managing Phytophthora diseases in horticultural nurseries. JENNIFER PARKE, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

An Expanding Virome of Cultivated Plants: Home Grown or Imported?

Organizers: Sead Sabanadzovic, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; John Hammond, USDA ARS FNPRU, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Virology; Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection; Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens
Financial Sponsor: APS/APHIS Working Group on Widely Prevalent Viruses

A number of new viruses/diseases have been recently reported from various economic crops. This session will address the emergence of new viruses in these crops and will discuss their possible origins (either by emergence from native vegetation or their introduction with imported planting material). The ultimate goal is to get a better understanding of where these new viruses are coming from in order to design and impose appropriate control and selection measures to maintain healthy crops.

  • Grapevine viruses and viral diseases: State of the art. GIOVANNI MARTELLI, Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy
  • Viruses of berry crops: Emerging, newly identified, and getting around. ROBERT R. MARTIN, USDA-ARS Horticulture Crops Research Unit, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • Emergence, origins, and potential control points for new viruses affecting ornamental crops. JOHN HAMMOND, USDA-ARS FNPRU, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • The origin and spread of viruses infecting vegetables and row crops—Lessons to be learned from past decades. WULF MENZEL, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany
  • With a little help from their “friends”: The remarkable emergence of geminiviruses as one of the largest and widely distributed families of plant viruses. ROBERT GILBERTSON, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Viroids: New and continuing risks to agriculture. ROSEMARIE HAMMOND, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.

 

Banned: Turfgrass Disease Control in the Age of Restrictive Pesticide Legislation

Organizers: John Inguagiato, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, U.S.A.; Lee Miller, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; Young-Ki Jo, Texas A&M, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Turfgrass Pathology

Legislation restricting pesticide use on turfgrass has emerged on a limited scale in the United States. However, pesticide bans on turfgrass have been enacted throughout Canada. This session will focus on issues inspiring legislation and on challenges of managing turfgrass disease without the judicious use of pesticides. Canadian and U.S. industry leaders and scientists will share current management approaches and discuss future potential strategies for controlling turf disease without pesticides.

  • Canadian pesticide restrictions – A cautionary history. TERI YAMADA, IPM Council Canada, Milton, ON, Canada
  • Public perception of pesticide use and current regulatory debates in the United States. CHAVA MCKEEL, Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, Lawrence, KS, U.S.A.
  • Fate and risk of pesticides applied to turfgrass systems. MARK CARROLL, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.
  • Alternative ways for managing turfgrass diseases. JOSEPH VARGAS, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • The Vineyard Club: A case study of pesticide-free turfgrass management. JOHN INGUAGIATO, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Beyond Borlaug: How the Next Generation of Plant Pathologists Are Advancing the Green Revolution

Organizers: Alejandra Huerta and Ana Cristina Fulladolsa, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Elisha Allen, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Graduate Student; Office of International Programs; Early Career Professionals

How is the 20% of the world population that lives in developed countries and consuming 86% of the world’s goods contributing to the scientific advancement of developing nations? This session will focus on current research and training capacity building activities that go beyond advancing scientific discovery to include education, training, learning, and dissemination of scientific knowledge on both ends.

  • Capacity building tomato farmers in Ghana: The case of IPM package. MICHAEL KWABENA OSEI, CSIR-Crops Research Institute, Kumasi, Ghana
  • A window of opportunity: Summer tomato production in Bangladesh. ALEJANDRA HUERTA, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Seeding a participatory soil and plant health program in Morogoro, Tanzania. ANNA TESTEN, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
  • Mountains beyond mountains: Challenges and opportunities for managing peanut diseases in Haiti. ABRAHAM FULMER, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
  • Agricultural science capacity building in Afghanistan: The role of plant pest diagnostics. TOM CRESWELL, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Boxwood Blight: Confronting an Emerging Disease Through Collaborative Connections

Organizers: Cristi Palmer, IR-4, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.; Mike Benson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens

This session will highlight the collaborative effort to study boxwood blight and how to manage this exotic disease. Soon after the pathogen was reported in the United States in 2011, a coalition among the green industry, scientists, and regulators endeavored to study the biology, epidemiology, control strategies, diagnostic tools, and populations to mitigate this highly destructive pathogen in production and in modern and historical landscapes.

  • Boxwood blight and the dawn of a research collaboration. SHARON DOUGLAS, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
  • Kryptonite for boxwood blight: Management with fungicides and sanitizers. JAMES LAMONDIA, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Windsor, CT, U.S.A.
  • Mortality/immortality of boxwood blight: Pathogen survival. NINA SHISHKOFF, USDA-ARS, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.
  • Boxwood blight: Identify, know, and conquer. JOANNE CROUCH, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • The show must go on: Boxwood and beyond. KELLY IVORS, North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A.
  • Boxin’ the blight: The green industry perspective & discussion session. JOE BISCHOFF, American Nursery Landscape Association, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

 

Destructive Tree Diseases Associated with Ambrosia/Bark Beetles: Black Swan Events in Tree Pathology

Organizers: Matthew Kasson, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; Randy Ploetz, University of Florida, Tropical Research & Education Center, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Forest Pathology; Regulatory Plant Pathology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Mycology; Tropical Plant Pathology; Vector-Pathogen Complexes

Destructive tree diseases associated with ambrosia and bark beetles have appeared recently in the United States. They threaten native and commercial tree species and typically involve non-coevolved encounters between host trees, the beetles, and their associated phytopathogens. We refer to these developments as Black Swan events in that they are unpredictable and have extreme impacts on the landscape. The proposed speakers will address the significant threats that are posed by these diseases.

  • Ambrosia and bark beetle-associated tree diseases: An overview. RANDY PLOETZ, University of Florida, Tropical Research & Education Center, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.
  • Beetles, vectors, and their role in Black Swan events. JIRI HULCR, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Hickory mortality associated with Ceratocystis smalleyi infection and mass attack by the hickory bark beetle, Scolytus quadrispinosis. JENNY JUZWIK, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • New perspectives on thousand cankers disease of walnut. MATTHEW KASSON, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
  • Laurel wilt disease: An exceptional Black Swan event. JASON SMITH, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program and Its Relationship to Plant Protection Products

Organizers: Paul Lewis, EPA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.; Gregory Hodges, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Regulatory Plant Pathology; Chemical Control; Industry; Public Policy Board

In 1996, Congress passed legislation for EPA to screen pesticides and drinking water contaminate chemicals for their potential to interact with the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife. This session will address the status of the EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program and its relationship for plant disease control. Presenters will address the legislative history, background and status of the program, experience from industry, and future for plant disease control.

  • Legislative history of the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. KELLYE EVERSOLE, Eversole and Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.
  • Evaluating results from the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program: A chemical case study. PATIENCE BROWNE, EPA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • Industry perspective. BETH CARROLL, Syngenta, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Relationship to plant disease control. PHIL BRANNEN, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.
  • New discoveries for plant disease control products based on Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program action. CHARLES PEARSON, Syngenta, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.

 

Extension Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Organizer: Mohamed Khan, North Dakota State University & University of Minnesota, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Extension; BASF; American Crystal Sugar Company 

This session will focus on the contributions of extension for 100 years and discuss strategies to maintain relevance for the future. Invited speakers will discuss the 100 years history of extension, analyze the evolving extension audience, and discuss how to make extension plant pathology relevant for the future for rural, urban, and suburban clienteles.

  • History of extension and land-grant universities. MOHAMED KHAN, North Dakota State University & University of Minnesota, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.
  • Extension today: Challenges of keeping extension relevant. BEVERLY DURGAN, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • Education of future extensionists and clientele. SALLY MILLER, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • Future of extension: Challenges and opportunities. HELENE DILLARD, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Challenges of funding an evolving extension service. MARTIN DRAPER, USDA-NIFA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Frontiers in Biosynthesis and Management of Mycotoxins

Organizers: Zhi-Yuan Chen, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; Hillary Mehl, Virginia Tech Tidewater AREC, Suffolk, VA, U.S.A.; Ramon Jaime, School of Plant Science, USDA-ARS, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Mycotoxicology; Host Resistance; Biological Control; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology

Mycotoxins produced by many pathogens cause significant economical loss and are a major food and feed safety concern. The main focus of this session is to capture the latest research progresses/efforts in understanding how and why mycotoxins are being produced and in managing mycotoxin contamination of various crops through conventional and novel approaches.

  • Insights into the evolution of toxin biosynthesis in the fungus Fusarium. ROBERT PROCTOR, USDA-ARS, Peoria, IL, U.S.A.
  • Genomics approaches to characterize the regulatory circuits of Aspergillus flavus controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis. GARY PAYNE, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Genetics and next-generation sequencing in identifying marker for aflatoxin resistance in maize. MARILYN WARBURTON, USDA-ARS, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.
  • Plant elicitor peptides in enhancing maize resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection. ALISA HUFFAKER, USDA-ARS, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • From one to many: Expansion of biocontrol for effective control of aflatoxin in Africa. RANAJIT BANDYOPADHYAY, IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria; and PETER COTTY, USDA-ARS, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Funding Opportunities for Cooperative International Research

Organizer: John Bowman, USAID, Rockville, MD, U.S.A.; Angela Records, USAID, Rockville, MD, U.S.A.; Sue Cohen, Center for Regulatory Research, LLC, White Bear Lake, MN, U.S.A. 
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Office of International Programs; Early Career Professionals; Extension; Regulatory Plant Pathology; Tropical Plant Pathology

This discussion session is designed to inform early career and established career scientists about the increase in research funding for cooperative international projects and fellowship experiences. Speakers will outline procedures to apply for research grants and discuss what constitutes a good, feasible, and potentially fundable project. The audience will be able to interact with speakers through a question/answer dialogue.

  • International Programs and Opportunities at NIFA. KITTY CARDWELL, USDA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • Funding Opportunities for Agricultural Research at USAID. JOHN BOWMAN, USAID, Rockville, MD, U.S.A.
  • USAID Fellowship Programs. CLARA COHEN, USAID, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  •  Supporting Agricultural Research in Africa . DAVID NIELSON, World Bank, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • The Borlaug Global Rust Initiative: A Successful Cooperative International Research Community. MATTHEW ROUSE, USDA-ARS and University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Innovative Approaches to Control Difficult Bacterial Pathogens

Organizers: Lindsay Triplett, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Evan Johnson, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Bacteriology; Widely Prevalent Bacterial Pathogens

Some of the most important bacterial diseases are especially difficult to study, detect, and control. Insect transmission, long latency periods, and lack of chemical controls and natural genetic resistance can thwart efforts toward plant protection against diseases such as citrus greening, zebra chip, and Pierce’s disease. This session aims to highlight some of the innovative methods being developed toward the genetic and biological control of these pathogens.

  • Precise engineering of genomes with sequence-specific nucleases. DANIEL VOYTAS, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. MN, U.S.A.
  • Development of Citrus tristeza virus-based tools to study and control citrus canker and greening. WILLIAM DAWSON, University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.
  • Targeting virulence genes of the zebra chip pathogen, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’. HONG LIN, USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.
  • Factors influencing transmission of the huanglongbing (greening) pathogen by the Asian citrus psyllid and methods for interrupting the transmission process. KIRSTEN PELZ-STELINSKI, University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.
  • Development of a phage-based biocontrol system for Pierce’s disease. CARLOS GONZALEZ, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Interconnected Lifecycles: Multitrophic Interactions Between Plants, Pathogens, and Insects

Organizers: Dorith Rotenberg and Karen Alviar, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Alma Laney, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Virology
Financial Sponsor: AgBiome, Inc.

There are several examples in the literature that document the beneficial or mutual association between vectors and the pathogens they transmit to plant hosts. In this session, the presenters highlight the complex and dynamic ways vectored pathogens modulate plant and vector hosts to favor pathogen establishment and spread.

  • Introduction to the topic. DORITH ROTENBERG, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • Across the spectrum: Effects of virus infections on host preference and fitness of vectors. RAJAGOPALBABU SRINIVASAN, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
  • Cucumber mosaic virus-induced changes in volatile production and plant quality: Implications for disease transmission and multitrophic interactions. KERRY MAUCK, University of Pennsylvania, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Characterizing the interaction between salt-stressed soybeans, viral infection, and vector performance. ALMA LANEY, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
  • Insect vectors are ‘deceptively’ attracted to suboptimal trees infected by a bacterial pathogen: Can the environment be manipulated to prevent vectors from finding infected trees? LUKASZ STELINSKI, Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.
  • A tale of how phytoplasma effectors alter plant-pathogen-insect interactions: It’s a mad MADS world. ALLYSON MACLEAN, John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • Discussion

 

Myths and Realities of Biopesticides: Academic, Industry, and Grower Perspectives

Organizer: Matthew Krause, BioWorks, Inc., Victor, NY, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Biological Control; Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases; Industry; Regulatory Plant Pathology; Pathogen Resistance

Biopesticide use in plant disease management has grown steadily over the past 20 years. Still, many growers, crop consultants, and extension pathologists are reluctant to include registered biopesticides in integrated disease management programs. The goal of this session is to provide practical insights into the evolution of the U.S. biopesticide industry and the strengths, limitations, and real-world applications of registered biopesticides from academic, industry, and grower perspectives.

  • Introduction to commercially available biopesticides and the biopesticide industry: History and current status. BILL STONEMAN, Biopesticide Industry Alliance, McFarland, WI, U.S.A.
  • Foliar biopesticides: Mechanisms, strengths, and limitations. SHOUAN ZHANG, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.
  • Soilborne biopesticides: Mechanisms, strengths, and limitations. BRIAN MCSPADDEN-GARDENER, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • Marketing, support, and effective use of biopesticides in organic, sustainable, and conventional crop production. MATTHEW KRAUSE, BioWorks, Inc., Victor, NY, U.S.A.
  • Optimizing use of biopesticides for successful, cost-effective plant disease management in ornamentals production. ROGER MCGAUGHEY, Pioneer Gardens, Deerfield, MA, U.S.A.
  • Optimizing use of biopesticides for successful, cost-effective plant disease management in greenhouse vegetable production. MICHAEL BLEDSOE, Village Farms, Heathrow, FL, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

New Products & Services

Organizer: Leah L. Granke, Hilliard, OH, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Industry

This session provides a forum for highlighting new products and technologies available to those in the fields of agriculture and plant disease management.

  • ARM Tablet Data Collector. STEVEN GYLLING, Gylling Data Management, Inc., Brookings, SD, U.S.A.
  • New from ADAMA: NIMITZ and Custodia. HERB YOUNG, DARIO NARVAEZ, ADAMA, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Dino-Lite Digital Microscope EDGE Series. JOE KANE, Dino-Lite Scopes (BigC), Torrance, CA, U.S.A.
  • Cotton cultivars with new or novel host plant resistance (RKN). JERALD PATAKY, Monsanto, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.
  • New controlled environment for growing plants. DANN ADAIR, Conviron, Winnipeg, MB Canada
  • Harvesting the crop microbiome. MATHIAS TWIZEYIMANA, AgBiome, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.

 

Plant Pathologists of the Future: Showcasing the Top Graduate Students from APS Division Meetings

Organizers: Lawrence Datnoff, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; David Rosenberger, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Divisional Forum

This session is designed to showcase the top graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) from five APS division meetings. The chosen speakers will give a presentation of their research that won them top honors at their respective division meeting. Speakers are allowed 15 minutes for their presentations, and this includes time for questions. This session will highlight some of the top students in the field of plant pathology and broaden the engagement and visibility of APS divisions.

  • North Central Division - Frankliniella occidentalis proteins that interact orrespondto Tomato spotted wilt virus infection of the insect vector.ISMAEL BADILLO-VARGAS, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • Northeastern Division - A proposed new model for beech bark disease development in aftermath forests. JONATHAN CALE, SUNY ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A.
  • Pacific Division - What Alternaria species cause diseases of potato in the Pacific Northwest? . LYDIA TYMON, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.
  • Potomac Division - Xanthomonas effector AvrRxo1 suppresses plant immunity by regulating the plant stomatal aperture sizes. SHUCHI WU, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
  • Southern Division - Effects of infection timing on Wheat streak severity. JACOB PRICE, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.

 

Potyviruses: Functional Genomics and Virus-Host Interactions

Organizers: Satyanarayana Tatineni, USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; Alexander Karasev, Department of PSES, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Virology

The family Potyviridae comprises ~30% of all known plant viruses and affects economically important food crops worldwide. In recent years, rapid progress has been made in defining potyviral gene functions, identifying potyviral determinants responsible for overcoming host resistance, and understanding mechanisms of resistance to potyviruses. These studies will potentially aid in identifying key steps in pathosystems for the development of new disease prevention and mitigation strategies.

  • Advances in potyvirus-host interactions. JARI VALKONEN, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • Ribosomal frameshifting in translation of the overlapping potyviral ORF, PIPO. WILLIAM A. MILLER, Iowa State Univ, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Multiple roles of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virus biology. SATYANARAYANA TATINENI, USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.
  • Lessons learned from interaction of Soybean mosaic virus with soybean. REZA HAJIMORAD, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.
  • Interactions of Bean common mosaic virus with resistance genes in common beans. ALEXANDER KARASEV, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Revealing the Stories of the Genome Via Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS)

Organizers: Lance Cadle-Davidson, USDA-ARS, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; Nicole Donofrio, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics, Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology

GBS is a low-cost, high-resolution DNA marker technology that exemplifies the big data revolution. Following up on a 2013 GBS methods workshop with 100 attendees, this session will highlight success stories in the application of GBS in diverse pathosystems and speakers will discuss some of the challenges of adapting GBS to their study system. A key component will be a panel discussion, providing attendees the opportunity to have their questions and ideas directly addressed.

  • The use of GBS to improve genome assembly. JEFF GLAUBITZ, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • GBS for mapping powdery mildew resistance in grapevine breeding populations. LANCE CADLE-DAVIDSON, USDA-ARS, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • RADseq: A population genomics tool to study the genetic diversity of Exobasidium sp., an emerging blueberry pathogen. JANE STEWART, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.
  • Application of GBS in population genetic analyses. DANIEL CROLL, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Population genetic analysis in Phytophthora. SYDNEY EVERHART, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.
  • GBS application in Fusarium population genetic analysis. MARIA JIMENEZ-GASCO, Penn State University, State College, PA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Schroth Faces of the Future: Virology

Organizers: Christopher Wallis, USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; Kimberly Cochran, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Early Career Professionals; Virology

Each year, the Schroth Faces of the Future recognizes early career professionals (those within 10 years of graduating) who are up-and-comers within their field of study. The field of study rotates each year, with this year hosting up-and-comers in the field of plant virology.

  • Visualizing molecular signatures of host-virus protein interactions using high resolution mass spectrometry. MICHELLE CILIA, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Identification of new and previously unreported plant viruses from North America and Ecuador: The first step towards virus disease management. DIEGO QUITO-AVILA, Centro de Investigaciones Biotecnologicas del Ecuador CIBE-ESPOL, Guayaquil, Ecuador
  • Reverse genetics and virus epidemiology: Integrating basic and applied research for disease management. THANUJA THEKKE VEETIL, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.

 

Supply, Physical Access, Economic Access, and Utilization: How are the Four Dimensions of Food Security Affected by Plant Diseases?

Organizer: Clayton Hollier, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation; Epidemiology; Integrated Plant Disease Management

The multiple dimensions of food security imply that interdisciplinary, multisectoral approaches are required to address it. Each dimension may be weakened or strengthened by a number of factors and may act in a transient or chronic manner. This session will address the effects of plant diseases and pathogens on the four dimensions of food security—food supply, physical access to food, economic access to food, and food utilization—and will elaborate on the challenges we face as well as possible solutions.

  • The multiple dimensions of food security and their challenges. PAUL TENG, National Institute of Education, Singapore, Singapore
  • How important are plant diseases as major causes of food insecurity? CLAYTON HOLLIER, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
  • Environmental interactions and multiple forcing leading to shifts and variability of crop yield losses. SERGE SAVARY, INRA, Toulouse, France
  • Loss and wastage in the food supply chain caused by microbes. TREVOR SUSLOW, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Networks and international collaboration in food security. ADRIANA MURILLO WILLIAMS, University de Costa Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica
  • Discussion

 

The Complicated Lifestyles of Dothideomycete Fungi: Understanding Novel Mechanisms of Pathogenicity

Organizers: Ashok Chanda, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; Burton Bluhm and Robert Hirsch, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology

Dothideomycete fungal pathogens infect many crops, but genetic regulation of virulence remains poorly understood. Recent advances in genetic analysis and functional genomics, combined with an elucidation of the biological parameters underlying host-pathogen interactions, have uncovered novel mechanisms of pathogenesis. This session will address key questions in fungal biology and genetics that provide fresh perspectives on fundamental processes governing the host recognition and pathogen virulence.

  • Investigations of how the necrotrophic specialist is inducing plant disease. TIMOTHY FRIESEN, USDA-ARS, Cereal Crops Research, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.
  • Molecular dissection of stomatal infection in Cercospora zeae-maydis. BURTON BLUHM, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
  • The stealth pathogenicity of Mycosphaerella graminicola (aka Zymoseptoria tritici). STEPHEN GOODWIN, USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Research Unit and Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Cercospora kikuchii: From detection to identification of key virulence proteins. ASHOK CHANDA, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.
  • Dothideomycete leaf-dwelling plant pathogens require specific virulence factors for colonization and host plants have developed a specific class of R genes against them. PIERRE DE WIT, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands
  • Discussion

 

Understanding Phytobiomes to Improve Agricultural Productivity

Organizers: Gwyn A. Beattie, Iowa State University, Plant Pathology & Microbiology, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; Angela Records, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.; Kellye Eversole, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.; Jan Leach, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Public Policy Board

The phytobiome is defined as the entire microbial community in, on and adjacent to plants. The capacity to study the phytobiome as a system will reveal how the associated microbial community influences, or is influenced by, the plant. These fundamental discoveries can be applied to improve crop productivity, address environmental challenges, and assure food safety. APS PPB has launched the Phytobiomes Initiative to gain a comprehensive understanding of phytobiomes and the capacity for their optimization by 2025. The goal of this symposium is to illustrate why funding investments in phytobiome approaches are critical by highlighting what we have not been able to learn by looking at individual organisms and by revealing what can be learned when microbiomes are studied as a system.

  • The phyllosphere microbiome: Responses to and impacts on plants. JULIA A. VORHOLT, Institute of Microbiology, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
  • How do organisms communicate (cross-kingdom communications) in the phytobiome? VITTORIO VENTURI, International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste, Italy.
  • Separating signal from noise in the design and analysis of host-microbial communities. ERIC W. TRIPLETT, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • How do agricultural practices impact the animal microbiome? THAD STANTON, National Animal Disease Center, USDA-ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Phytobiome, a new view of crop production- an industry perspective. MAGALIE GUILHABERT-GOYA, Bayer CropScience LP, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Wrap-up and discussion—Aligning the policy stars for a concerted phytobiomes effort: KELLYE EVERSOLE, Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A.

 

What’s App? Using Apps and Technology in Integrated Plant Disease Management Programming

Organizers: Erika Saalau Rojas, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; Jose Pablo Soto Arias, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Integrated Plant Disease Management; Turfgrass Pathology

In recent years, online tools and mobile apps have become essential in delivering plant disease identification and management strategies in extension, education, and research settings. But what do you need to know to create an app? This session will focus on potential uses of apps in an IPDM program and highlight apps currently available.

  • Gene-Z and iDx: Affordable hand-held decentralized genetic testing platforms. SYED HASHSHAM, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • The Turfpath App: Crowdsourcing the path of turfgrass pests. JOHN KAMINSKI, Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Plant pathology for a song: App use in the classroom (and hitting the right notes). JANNA BECKERMAN, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Integrating grower-driven and publically held data for improved plant protection. RUSSELL GROVES, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Are apps the future? DAREN MUELLER, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion 

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