2013 APS-MSA Annual Meeting
PRELIMINARY SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Listed alphabetically. Sessions are preliminary and subject to change.


13th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: What's in Our Toolbox to Minimize the Risk of Plant Disease?

Monday, August 12
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizer: Kira Bowen, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE); APS Foundation
Selected graduate students will present their work on minimizing plant disease risk. Minimization of this risk might be accomplished through new resistance strategies in plants; knowledge gained through disease forecasting and spatial modeling; or implementation of innovative management programs, new chemistries, or biological control agents. Presenters for this session are selected on the basis of the originality and significance of their approach to reducing plant disease risk.

  • Soft red winter wheat yield and quality as influenced by the Fusarium head blight-Stagonospora leaf blotch complex and 
    disease management strategies. J. D. SALGADO, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • Factors affecting the timing of abscission of peach and nectarine leaves infected with Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni
    S. BARDSLEY, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Environmental and management factors associated with bacterial rots of onion in Pennsylvania. E. E. PFEUFER, The
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Integrated control of Allium white rot. A. E. FERRY, University of California-Davis, Woodland, CA, U.S.A.
  • An integrated approach to understanding tomato sour rot and improving disease management. K. FIEDLER, Virginia 
    Tech Eastern Shore AREC, Painter, VA, U.S.A.

 

An Unconventional Classroom: Reaching New Students with Online and Distance Courses and Programs

Monday, August 12
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Maya Hayslett, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Anissa Poleatewich, Vineland Research & Innovation Center, Vineland Station, ON, Canada
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Office of Education; Teaching
Technological advances now allow instructors to connect with students at other campuses and universities. With online and distance education courses, instructors are reaching more students, or students who might not otherwise get the chance, with fewer resources. Speakers for this session are instructors who currently teach these kinds of courses. They will discuss the advantages and the challenges of teaching these courses, as well as the kinds of resources that are necessary to start one.

  • Selection and use of technology for offering a distance course in plant pathology. D. SHEW, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • The challenges and advantages of teaching introductory plant pathology at a distance. E. LITTLE, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.
  • Teaching tropical plant pathology to a global audience. J. RISTAINO, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Masters-level agricultural biosecurity education for location-bound adult learners. G. KULDAU, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • What's in it for us? Creating financial and academic incentives for faculty in an online degree program. D. PFEIFFER, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Counting Beans & Tooting Horns: Effective Metrics for Documenting the Impact of Research and Extension

Wednesday, August 14
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizer: Amanda Gevens, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Extension; Early Career Professionals; Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection
This session will focus on effective metrics for documenting impact in plant pathology programs. Leading researchers and specialists will demonstrate methods and metrics for effectively evaluating the impact of research and extension programs. Documenting impact is highly valued for justifying grant funding and annual reporting to university administration and beyond. Logistics and case studies will be offered in this session designed for all plant pathologists (extension and research).

  • Introduction—Defining impact: From website hits to change in practice. A. J. GEVENS, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Planning for evaluation of your research and application. T. BARTHOLOMAY, Minnesota Office of Higher Education, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • The importance of documenting impact—A Washington perspective. M. DRAPER, USDA-NIFA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • A case study in documenting impact in research. C. SMART, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Documenting the impact of 10 years of IPM on Wisconsin cranberry production: A case study in documenting impact in extension. J. COLQUHOUN, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Emerging Issues of Mycotoxins in Food Safety

Tuesday, August 13
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Ramon Jaime, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; Themis Michailides, University of California-Davis, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Mycotoxicology; Seed Pathology
New discoveries have demonstrated the production of mycotoxins by fungi not previously known to produce mycotoxins. Additionally, weather-related events have induced contamination in wide production areas. Registrations of atoxigenic biocontrols have created challenges concerning application practices. The scope of this session is to provide information to the public on the risks of mycotoxin contamination in commodities not previously known and on the effects of weather on mycotoxin outbreaks.

  • Impacts of the Midwest 2012 drought on aflatoxin contamination of maize. A. E. ROBERTSON, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Influence of weather on aflatoxin-producing fungi and aflatoxin concentrations in crops. P. COTTY, USDA-ARS, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
  • Challenges in using the biopesticide AF36 in pistachio orchards to reduce aflatoxin contamination. T. MICHAILIDES, University of California-Davis, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.
  • Fumonisin production by black Aspergillus species in maize. G. MUNKVOLD, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • When mycotoxins come in bunches: Fumonisin production by Aspergillus niger in grapes. J. PALUMBO, USDA-ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A.
  • Aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in corn smut (Ustilago maydis) galls in the field and in the grocery store. H. ABBAS, USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Exploring Genomic and Molecular Mechanisms of Host-Parasite Interactions for Crop Protection

Wednesday, August 14
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: Yulin Jia, USDA-ARS, Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center, Stuttgart, Arkansas, U.S.A.; Guo-Liang Wang, Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Working group of the Chinese Society of Plant Pathology (CSPP) and The American Phytopathological Society (APS)
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Over the past two decades, significant breakthroughs in host-pathogen interactions have provided a solid foundation for disease management. The recent rapid evolution of DNA sequencing technology, gene expression profiling, and bioinformatics has presented unique, exciting, and unprecedented opportunities for international corporations. Presently, diverse powerful molecular and genetic tools have been developed to manage crop diseases worldwide. The present and future challenges for crop protection lie in unpredictable climate changes, pathogen population variability, fungicide resistance, and host genotype shifting. However, rapid accumulation of scientific knowledge on molecular and genetic bases of host-pathogen interactions will allow the development of the most economical strategies for the management of crop pathogens worldwide. Current advances in host-pathogen interactions and their immediate applications to crop protection will be presented by selected speakers, three from APS and three from CSPP.

  • The Peanut Genome Consortium and peanut genome sequence: Creating a better future through global food security. B. GUO, USDA-ARS, Crop Protection and Management Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
  • The genome of the stripe rust pathogen and interactions with its host plants. X. CHEN, USDA-ARS Wheat Genetics, Quality Physiology and Disease Research, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.
  • Global efforts in managing rice blast disease. Y. JIA, USDA-ARS, Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center, Stuttgart, AR, U.S.A.
  • Mycotoxins produced by the rice false smut pathogen. L.-G. ZHOU, China Agricultural University, Beijing, Peoples Republic of China
  • Mechanisms and management of carbendazim resistance in Gibberella zeae. M.-G. ZHOU, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Peoples Republic of China
  • Primary research progress on the resistance of rice varieties against two rice viruses transmitted by small brown planthoppers (SBPH) in China. T. ZHOU, Institute of Plant Protection, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples Republic of China

 

Filling in the Gaps: How Do Xanthomonads Adapt to Diverse Hosts, Tissues, and Environments?

Tuesday, August 13
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Valerie Verdier, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France; Lindsay Triplett, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Globally important xanthomonads cause diseases on diverse crops, including banana, cassava, and rice. Xanthomonads have evolved different tissue specificities, with some invading the vascular tissues, some restricted to the intercellular spaces, and others colonizing the plant surface. This session, which is co-organized by members of the French and American phytopathology societies, will cover genome plasticity and biological changes that allow adaption to new environments and hosts.

  • The xylan utilization system of Xanthomonas campestris controls epiphytic life and reveals common features with animal gut symbionts. M. ARLAT, INRA/CNRS University Toulouse 3, Castanet Tolosan, France
  • Contribution of type III/TAL effectors to pathogenicity. R. KOEBNIK, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France
  • Genome and transcriptome analysis to reveal adaptation to new environments and hosts. L. GAGNEVIN, UMR PVBMT, CIRAD, Saint-Pierre, La Réunion, France
  • Differences in patterns of host transcriptome modulation as a measure of diversity and adaptation of TAL effector-wielding Xanthomonas populations. A. J. BOGDANOVE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.
  • Flagellar motility and fitness in xanthomonads. M. A. JACQUES, UMR1345 IRHS, Beaucouzé, France
  • Discussion

 

Filling the Gap: Understanding Factors Driving Expanding Distributions of Plant Viruses

Wednesday, August 14
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: Jing Zhou, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; Judith Brown, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Virology; Vector-Pathogen Complexes
Financial Sponsors: Eurofins STA Laboratories; Agdia, Inc.; Monsanto Company
Plant viruses continuously emerge and encroach on new areas, but there are knowledge gaps in the current understanding of the factors driving expanding virus distribution. This session is a timely examination of the drivers of virus distribution, including changes in weather patterns and cropping systems and changes in domestic and international movement of plant materials, as well as the impact of virus genetic evolutionary on its expanding distribution.

  • Climate change effects on physiology and population processes of hosts and vectors that influence the spread of hemipteran-borne plant viruses. A. FERERAS CASTIEL, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Madrid, Spain
  • The panacea of host resistance genes: The inadvertent selection of resistance-breaking viruses. J. BROWN, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.
  • Evolutionary genetics factors underlying the emergence and spread of plant RNA viruses. S. ELENA, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas/The Santa Fe Institute, Valencia, Spain
  • Suitcase importation and other venues for the introduction of exotic plant pathogens. D. GOLINO, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Free trade, fair trade, safe trade: The role of plant pathology in filling regulatory gaps. W. A. GUTIERREZ, USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Functional, Evolutionary, and Ecological Diversity of Wood Decay Systems

Sunday, August 11
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizer: David Hibbett, Clark University, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Mycology
Wood decay has profound biogeochemical consequences, impacts timber-based industries, and has potential applications in biofuels. Wood decayers have been divided into two categories: white rot and brown rot, but genomics has revealed diversity within each class, and ecologists have long shown substrate and habitat preferences of particular species. This session highlights the diversity of wood decay systems from the perspectives of genomics, biochemistry, evolutionary biology, and ecology.

  • Mechanisms of wood decay inferred from recent genome investigations. D. CULLEN, USDA Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Time-dependent expression of genes encoded by Phanerochaete carnosa during growth on heartwood from deciduous and coniferous wood. E. MASTER, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Wood decay in the Ozark Highlands: Variation across species, space, and time. A. ZANNE, George Washington University, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • Wood-rotting fungi have a dark history: Evidence from the fossil record. C. HARPER, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, U.S.A.
  • Wood decay in extreme environments. R. BLANCHETTE, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.
  • Novel industrial lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. A. BERLIN, Novozymes, Inc., Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Diversification of wood decay systems in early evolution of Agaricomycotina. L. NAGY, Clark University, Worcester, MA, U.S.A. 

 

Fungal Ecology Beyond Boundaries: From Communities to the Globe

Tuesday, August 13
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizer: Nicole Hynson, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Financial Sponsors: New Phytologist Trust; Fungal Ecology/Elsevier Publishing; MSA Ecology Committee
This session will bring together leading international researchers from the field of ecology whose research foci include topics in fungal ecology at the community, landscape, ecosystem, or global scales. Since there is often a disconnect between researchers working at different biological or geographical scales, this session will provide a venue with which to bridge this gap, giving researchers from a diversity of backgrounds and expertise a chance to present and to interact with new potential colleagues.

  • The functioning of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses from local communities to biomes. J. KLIRONOMOS, The University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, Kelowna, BC, Canada
  • Fungal ecology in a community context: Nectar microfungi interacting with bacteria, plants, and birds. T. FUKAMI, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A.
  • Does nitrogen availability affect ectomycorrhizal fungal communities at the regional scale? F. COX, University of Manchester, Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • Functional geography of fungal decomposition pathways. J. TALBOT, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A.
  • Aboveground-belowground linkages: Extrapolating local to global fungal biodiversity. D. L. TAYLOR, Institute of Arctic Biology-University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, U.S.A.
  • Strangers in a strange land: Do Alnus and Salix trees associate with different ectomycorrhizal fungi outside their native ranges. P. KENNEDY, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR, U.S.A.
  • The relative influence of evolutionary history, climate, and space on current distributions of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at the global scale. S. KIVLIN, University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX, U.S.A.
  • From roots to biomes: A continental-scale look at fungal diversity in North American pine forests. K. PEAY, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A.

  

Innovations in Microbial Forensics and Plant Biosecurity

Monday, August 12
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Jacqueline Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; James Stack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Russ Bulluck, USDA APHIS PPQ CPHST, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Forrest Nutter, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; Carla Thomas, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; William Schneider, USDA-ARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Microbial Forensics Interest Group; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE); Epidemiology
Recent technical innovations for forensic plant pathology include enhanced strategies for pathogen detection, strain discrimination, sampling, epidemiology, and bioinformatics. Speakers from both the plant pathology and human forensics communities will address use of platforms for next-generation sequencing and metagenomics, sensor and sampling issues, new bioinformatics tools, and novel strategies such as machine learning.

  • Forensic epidemiology: Novel digital epidemiology methods. T. QUITUGUA, National Biosurveillance Integration Center, Dept. of Homeland Security, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
  • Forensic epidemiology: New sensor-based plant pathogen detection: Where to look for evidence in a 300-acre crop. F. NUTTER, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Advances in pathogen detection for forensic plant pathology. N. BERGMAN, National Bioforensic Analysis Center, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.
  • Forensic methods for pathogen strain typing. J. BURANS, National Bioforensic Analysis Center, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.
  • Bioinformatics strategies for microbial forensics. W. SCHNEIDER, USDA-ARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 

 

Innovations in Seed Treatments for Crop Protection and Health

Wednesday, August 14
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: Gary Munkvold and Gregory Tylka, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Seed Pathology; Nematology
Financial Sponsors: BASF US Crop Protection; Syngenta SeedsCare; Valent U.S.A. Corporation; Seed Science Center-Iowa State University
In recent years, the use of seed treatments has expanded dramatically in scope and depth. These changes provide new opportunities and challenges. Scientists from throughout the world will discuss the latest, most innovative aspects of seed treatments for maintaining and increasing plant protection and crop health. Topics include the implementation of multiple active ingredients in seed treatment combinations; microbial treatments; physiological effects on plants; and more!

  • Development and formulation of seed treatment combinations. K. ARTHUR, Valent USA Corp., Plano, TX, U.S.A.
  • Implementation of seed treatment formulations by the seed industry. G. LAMKA, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA, U.S.A.
  • Biological control through microbial seed treatments. G. HARMAN, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Nematode-protectant seed treatments: New options for nematode management in row crops. G. TYLKA, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Physiological benefits of seed treatments. P. CASTRO, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

 

Insect-Transmitted Bacterial Diseases: Passing the Gift

Wednesday, August 14
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: Jeri Barak and Jose Pablo Soto-Arias, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Vector-Pathogen Complexes; Bacteriology
Relationships between insect vectors and those bacterial pathogens transmitted by them are often not well understood or appreciated, which has lead to devastating epidemics of incurable diseases and the lack of effective control strategies. This session would focus on the biology, epidemiology, and management of insect-transmitted bacterial diseases that cause significant agricultural losses, including foodborne diseases.

  • Recent advances in understanding the biology of the insect-transmitted bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa. C. ROPER, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Phytophagous insects, Salmonella enterica, produce a tritrophic interaction that can make you sick. J. P. SOTO-ARIAS, University Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Pantoea stewartii uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms. M. REDINBAUGH, USDA-ARS, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • Erwinia tracheiphila: Getting around with a little help from my friends. E. SAALAU-ROJAS, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.
  • Genomics of Erwinia amylovora–host interactions: Update and perspective. Y. F. ZHAO, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Interaction Between Plants and Human Pathogens

Wednesday, August 14
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Maeli Melotto, University of Texas-Arlington, Arlington, TX, U.S.A.; Jacqueline Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: APS Food Safety Interest Group; Public Policy Board
Contamination of foods with human pathogens is a major issue to society, with increasing numbers of outbreaks in the last several years. Recent studies reveal that plants are not passive to contamination by human pathogens. This session is designed to highlight current knowledge of plant responses toward infection; the biology and ecology of human pathogens on the phyllosphere; and the crucial role that phytopathologists can play in the prevention of human disease outbreaks.

  • A microbe is a microbe: What plant pathologists can and do to contribute to food safety research and outreach. S. MILLER, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.
  • Biology and ecology of human pathogens on the plant environment. M. BRANDL, USDA-ARS, WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A.
  • Salmonella's life in the roots. J. BARAK, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.
  • Plant immunity against human pathogens. M. MELOTTO, University of Texas-Arlington, Arlington, TX, U.S.A.
  • A food safety perspective on the interactions of enteric viruses with plants. K. KNIEL, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

  

Interactions and Mechanisms of Symptomless Plant Symbioses

Wednesday, August 14
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Klara Scharnagl, Florida International University, Miami, FL, U.S.A.; Robin Choudhury and Cassandra Swett, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: MSA; Mycology; Phyllosphere Microbiology; Postharvest Pathology; Turfgrass Pathology; Seed Pathology
There has long been difficulty in clearly defining and discussing symptomless infection states of plant-associated microbes. Many of these microbes have a wide variation in the types of host associations they form despite a similarity in mechanism of interaction between microbe and host. This interdisciplinary session focuses on fungi and bacteria with varied symptomless plant associations and the scenarios that can lead to shifts (if any) between mutualism/commensalism and pathogenesis.

  • Parallels between mutualism and pathogenesis: A comparison of lichen and pathogenic symbioses. E. MEDINA, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A.
  • Dual mutualist-antagonist dynamics of grass endophytes. S. FAETH, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.
  • Obligately lichen-associated fungi in the lichen microbiome: How did they get there and what are they doing? J. LAWREY, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, U.S.A.
  • Bacterial traits that mediate growth and survival in plants. S. LINDOW, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
  • Hemibiotrophy: The Magnaporthe oryzae–rice interaction. B. VALENT, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Invasive Threats to Palm Trees

Tuesday, August 13
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Richard Lee, USDA ARS NCGRCD, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; Carlos Angel, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Tropical Plant Pathology; Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Vector-Pathogen Complexes
Palms used for ornamental and food production in the United States are under increasing threats to invasive pathogens and pests. The purpose of this session is to educate and inform commodity stakeholders, regulatory personnel, nurseries, and interested scientists of the nature of the threats.

  • Molecular characterization of lethal yellows and other phytoplasmas. B. BEXTINE, University of Texas-Tyler, Tyler, TX, U.S.A.
  • Texas Phoenix palm decline and potential vectors. S. HALBERT, Florida Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Cadang-cadang disease of palm and other diseases. R. LEE, USDA ARS NCGRCD, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Diagnosis of palm declines in the National Plant Disease Diagnostic Network. K. ONG, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Palm diseases in Central America. M. MERCEDES ROCA, Zamorano University, Tegucigalpa, Honduras
  • Discussion

 

New Horizons in the Cell Biology of Fungi

Monday, August 12
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Rosa Mouriño-Pérez and Rufina Hernández-Martínez, CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
The session will cover a broad scope of the main topics in fungal cell biology, such as secretion, endocytosis, septation, polarity, sexual development, and also the cell biology of plant pathogens, to get an excellent update of the cutting-edge information in this field. We invited renowned researchers who specialize in each of the subjects of the session.

  • The glowing guts of Neurospora crassa hyphae. M. RIQUELME, CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico
  • Live cell imaging of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton during growth and development in Aspergillus nidulans. B. SHAW, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Talking amongst themselves: Molecular mechanisms of fungal communication. L. GLASS, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.
  • Following the compartmentalization of filamentous fungus. R. MOURIÑO-PÉREZ, CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico
  • Molecular signaling in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. N. REQUENA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • Discussion

 

New Products & Services

Tuesday, August 13
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizer: Rubella S. Goswami, DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE, U.S.A.
Section: Disease Control and Pest Management
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Industry
This session provides a forum for highlighting new products and technologies available to those in the fields of agriculture and plant disease management.

  • Fracture fungicide. H. JOOST, FMC Corporation, Greenbrae, CA, U.S.A.
  • Tolfenpyrad. J. ADAMS, Nichino America, Inc. Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.
  • OSO/TAVANO 5%SC fungicide. S. OCKEY, Certis USA, Yakima, WA, U.S.A.
  • DuPont Approach Prima fungicide. M. MARTIN, DuPont Crop Protection, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
  • FORTIX fungicide. B. JACOBSON, Cheminova Inc., Tifton, GA, U.S.A.
  • SolatenIol fungicide—A new SDHI fungicide from Syngenta. A. TALLY, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.
  • New Xemium turfgrass fungicides from BASF. R. KEESE, BASF Corporation, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.
  • Systiva XS: A new seed treatment from BASF. K. LIBERATOR, BASF Corporation, Durham, NC, U.S.A.
  • Periodic table of fungicides 3.2 app. B. OLSON, Dow AgroSciences LLC, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.
  • Rapid detection of FOV4 in cotton. S. ZHANG, Agdia Inc., Elkhart, IN, U.S.A.

 

One Fungus, One Name: The Impact of Recent Changes in Fungal Nomenclature

Wednesday, August 14
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Carrie Harmon, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; Carol Stiles, Georgia Military College, Valdosta, GA, U.S.A.
Section: Biology of Pathogens
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Mycology; Diagnostics; Widely Prevalent Plant-Pathogenic Fungi List Working Group; International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi
Financial Sponsor: Widely Prevalent Plant-Pathogenic Fungi List Working Group
Until recently, two systems of nomenclature existed for many fungi: one name for the sexual state and one for the asexual state. The coexistence of these two naming systems is now abolished in the International Code of Nomenclature (ICN), and a given fungus will receive a single name. This session will cover nomenclature within the revised ICN as well as provide updates for the process of registering names in some of the major groups of fungal plant pathogens. Join us for a lively discussion!

  • Overview of changes affecting fungal nomenclature in the International Code of Nomenclature and progress of nomenclatural working groups. K. SEIFERT, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Impact of ICN changes on scientific names of fungal plant pathogens. M. PALM, USDA APHIS PPQ National Identification Services, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • Colletotrichum and Dothideomycetes. P. CROUS, Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • Fusarium. D. GEISER, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Plant Pathologists of the Future: Showcasing the Top Graduate Students from APS Division Meetings

Wednesday, August 14
8:30 - 11:00 a.m.

Organizer: David Schmale, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.
Section: Professionalism/Outreach
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Divisional Forum
This session is designed to showcase the top graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) from each of the six APS division meetings. The chosen speakers will give a presentation of their research that won them top honors at their respective division meeting. Speakers are allowed 15 minutes for their presentations, and this includes time for questions. This session will highlight some of the top students in the field of plant pathology and broaden the engagement and visibility of APS divisions.

  • Prevalent citrus diseases in Puerto Rico. M. R. MARROQUIN-GUZMAN, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.
  • Detection of boscalid resistance and the H272R mutation in the SdhB gene of Blumeriella jaapii. C. A. OUTWATER, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.
  • Detection of Peronospora variabilis in quinoa seeds. A. L. TESTIN, Pennsylvania State University, University park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Dualism in symbiosis: Growth and defense enhancement of symptomless infection by the pathogen Fusarium circinatum in Pinus radiata seedlings. C. L. SWETT, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Xylella fastidiosa phoP/Q two-component system mediates colonization of grapevines and may be a potential target for Pierce's disease control. B. PIERCE, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi as a possible contributor to white oak (Quercus alba) decline in Mid-Atlantic forests. M. E. MCCONNELL, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.
  • Genetic analyses of ntpR encoding a novel negative regulator for toxoflavin production in the rice-pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia glumae. R. A. MELANSON, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.

 

Responses of Plant-Symbiotic Fungi to Climate Change: Diversity, Distribution, and Function

Wednesday, August 14
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizer: Christine Hawkes, University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX, U.S.A.
Section: Ecology and Epidemiology
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: MSA
Symbiotic fungi are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems, important for both plant communities and ecosystem functioning. Yet symbiont responses to climate change remain poorly understood. In this session, we address the ecological and evolutionary responses of fungal symbionts to changing climatic conditions, as well as their consequences for plant communities and ecosystem processes.

  • Fungal community responses to discrete precipitation pulses under altered rainfall intervals. A. JUMPPONEN, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • Climatic drivers of fungal endophyte distributions and their impacts on plant drought resistance. H. GIAUQUE, University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX, U.S.A.
  • Climate change, endophyte symbiosis, and ecosystem engineering in dunes: Can fungi improve coastal defense against storm surge? J. RUDGERS, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A.
  • Mycorrhizal feedback with global change: An ecophysiological perspective. G. MALCOLM, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.
  • Fires as global change: Responses by mycorrhizal fungi. K. TRESEDER, University of California, Irvine, CA, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Schroth Faces of the Future: New Frontiers in Mycology

Sunday, August 11
1:00 - 3:15 p.m.

Organizers: Christopher Wallis, USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; Teresa Hughes, USDA-ARS, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Early Career Professionals, Mycology
Schroth Faces of the Future is an annually occurring endowed session recognizing early career professionals (those within 10 years of receiving their Ph.D. degree) who are making an impact in plant pathology research. Each year, Schroth covers a different discipline of plant pathology, with 2013 to cover Faces of the Future in mycology.

  • Evolutionary informatics to wage peace with fungi for a sustainable future. J. C. SLOT, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.
  • Migration and evolution of Phytophthora plant pathogens in the age of globalization. E. M. GOSS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.
  • Measuring oomycete biodiversity in aquatic, forest, and agricultural ecosystems: Culture-based and metagenomic approaches. J. E. BLAIR, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, PA, U.S.A.
  • Evolutionary history and genetic diversity of Didymella bryoniae and Phoma caricae-papayae, pathogens of cucurbits and papaya. M. T. BREWER, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.

 

Small Noncoding RNAs: New Paradigms in Plant-Microbe Interactions

Sunday, August 11
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: James Bradeen, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; Leonardo De La Fuente, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Bacteriology; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology; Widely Prevalent Bacteria Working Group
Emerging scientific consensus suggests that small noncoding RNAs play key roles in gene regulation in plant–microbe interactions. Both partners use small RNAs to manipulate the other, with pathogens modulating plant resistance response pathways and plants modulating expression of both their own genes and those of potential pathogens. The session will focus on the role of small RNAs in regulating innate immunity and the implications for plant disease management and crop improvement.

  • The role of small RNAs in host–microbial interactions. H. JIN, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • The role of viral siRNAs in virus infections of maize. V. VANCE, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, U.S.A.
  • The role of sRNAs in the virulence of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. U. BONAS, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany
  • Phytophthora produces RNA-silencing repressors to promote infection. W. MA, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.
  • Application of small RNAs and RNA-silencing mechanisms in fungi. R. DEAN, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Status and Challenges in Identification and Diagnosis of Graminicolous Downy Mildews

Monday, August 12
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Organizers: Z. Gloria Abad, USDA-APHIS-CPHST, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; Patricia De Sa Snow, USDA-APHIS-BRS, Riverdale, MD, U.S.A.
Section: Diseases of Plants
Sponsoring Committees/Sponsors: Regulatory Plant Pathology; Emerging Diseases and Pathogens; Diagnostics
Graminicolous downy mildews affect important crops such as maize, millet, sorghum, and sugarcane where the pathogens are mostly understudied. Some Peronosclerospora and Sclerophthora species cause destructive diseases and are of biosecurity concern. This session will review aspects of the taxonomy (including new species and the genus Eraphthora published during 2011–2012), the regulatory status, and the challenges in developing robust systems for identification and diagnostics.

  • Biology of downy mildews from gramineaceous crops. G. PETERSON, Foreign Disease-Weed Science, USDA-ARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.
  • Downy mildews from gramineaceous crops in North America and those of regulatory concern. C. MAGILL, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Environment metagenomics of downy mildews. A. LEVESQUE, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
  • Taxonomy and phylogeny of graminicolous downy mildews. M. THINES, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Status, challenges, and tools in identification and diagnosis of Peronosclerospora and Sclerophthora of regulatory concern. Z. G. ABAD, USDA-APHIS-CPHST, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • Discussion

 

Virus Intracellular Accumulation and Movement as a Target for Disease Control

Sunday, August 11
1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Organizers: Richard Nelson, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; James Schoelz, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.
Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions
Sponsoring Committee/Sponsor: Virology
Disease is a culmination of virus accumulation and intracellular movement to allow systemic infection. A plethora of host proteins that influence virus accumulation and movement have been identified, and reduced systemic virus accumulation has been observed after silencing some of these genes. These host genes should be considered a new generation of resistance targets. The function of these host proteins, along with the potential of applying this research for practical benefit, will be discussed.

  • Investigating a new role for the Cauliflower mosaic virus P6 protein: Delivery of virions to plasmodesmata. J. SCHOELZ, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.
  • Grapevine fanleaf virus: Virus–host interactions at the plasmodesmata influencing movement. C. RITZENTHALER, CNRS, Strasbourg, France
  • The importance of chloroplast interactions for local and systemic movement of some members of the Alphaflexiviridae. J. HAMMOND, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • Host membrane recruitment for replication and intercellular movement of Turnip mosaic virus. J.-F. LALIBERTÉ, INRS, Laval, QC, Canada
  • Assessing vacuole trafficking and metabolizing components for their influence on tobamovirus-induced disease. X. YANG, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.
  • Summary of virus accumulation and movement findings and their potential application, with Q&A. R. NELSON, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc., Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.

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